ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

This sweet looking fellow is Nick, the long eared bat. Nick was doing his important insect munching work when he spotted a tasty looking insect stationary on a wall. He landed to grab it and was instead trapped on sticky fly paper. Our long eared bats are particularly susceptible to becoming trapped on fly paper because, unlike most of our other microbats, long eared bats will hunt stationary insects. We are very thankful that Nick was seen the next morning and taken straight to a vet. It’s an extremely delicate procedure to remove a bat from sticky fly paper but the vets did a marvellous job. It’s rare that bats survive sticky fly paper as the stress can send them into shock and they can attempt to chew themselves free causing horrific injuries. Nick has got off lightly with some soreness and superficial injuries that will heal in care. Please do not buy sticky insect traps and especially do not put them outside! It’s not just bats that suffer, small reptiles and birds can also be impacted. You can purchase container style fly traps from hardware stories that are not only very effective, but safe for wildlife.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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We are delighted to let you know that Spike has recovered from his nasty injuries from a predatory bird and has been released.
His lovely sponsor, Carlie, gave him a warrior’s name and he has lived up to this, fighting off the bird and then battling to recover from his injuries.
After this video was stopped, he looped back and flew majestically upwards and landed in the camp with the other flying-foxes.
If you look closely, you’ll notice the fur hasn’t yet regrown on his face. It’s normal for fur to fall out with some injuries. Spike’s injuries themselves are healed, he’s been checked over by a vet, and been given the all clear to be released. There’s no need to keep him in care longer while the fur regrows.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬ You could save a precious life like Spike's caller did.
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This handsome man is Dougal. He was found hanging low in a yard in suburban Brisbane.
He has no obvious injuries but likely has a concussion. Perhaps he flew into something or fell after squabbling with another flying-fox, or in the course of mating.
It’s mating season now and the boys’ testosterone levels are elevated which could explain why we seem to be getting more boys called in than girls at the moment.
Thank you sincerely to Donna and Sean for sponsoring Dougal. Your generous donation will help cover his costs while he’s in care.
If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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Following on from our fruit tree netting rescue at the home of a beekeeper, we’ve been called to another most unusual rescue: a bat on the platform of a container crane, around 30m (100 feet) high.
Sadly this Little Red Flying-fox boy’s injuries suggested he’d been taken by a predatory bird, possibly a sea eagle, and he’d bravely fought the bird until it dropped him, and he landed on the crane. His injuries were unfortunately not survivable and our rescuer took him to be humanely and peacefully put to rest.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This lovely boy is Snoop, named in honour of a beloved pooch who sadly passed last week.
Snoop has had a run of bad luck.
He was called in to us by a caring man who saw him on the ground in his front yard. He has skin off his lower lip and chin and is underweight so he may have flown into something and was too dazed to be able to find food for a day or so. On top of that he has three small injuries to his wings that suggest he was lightly entangled on a barbed wire fence and got himself off. By the amount of healing, it would have been about two weeks ago.
And finally, he has some nicks out of each ear, which could be bites from another bat or a possum.
This boy has some stories to tell!
You can see he *loves* smoothie, our nutritionally complete liquid diet that we give to our rehabbing flying-foxes. He’s working on regaining his lost weight most diligently!
Just like his batty namesake, doggy Snoop was full of life, adventurous and cheeky and packed a lot into his too-short seven years.
If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This pretty girl is Tad, the white striped freetail bat. Tad was found in the mouth of a dog after the owner heard a ruckus at night. Thankfully the owner was able to get their dog to drop Tad before they could do any serious harm. Knowing that Tad was likely injured, the owner called the RSPCA out to help. Tad was treated for minor injuries at the RSPCA before being transferred to us to continue her care. We are pleased to report that Tad has quickly recovered from her injuries and has been released back where she was found. We wish Tad safe travels as she continues her important work munching insects.

Not many people realise how harmful our pet dogs can be for wildlife. We advocate for dogs to be allowed to sleep inside at night to reduce their impact on nocturnal wildlife. Tad was extremely lucky, but so many animals do not share her luck. Ensure your much loved pets are not impacting on our native wildlife.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬

#bcrq #flyingfox #brisbane #queensland #notouchnorisk #fruitbat #bat #australia #wild #wildlife #wildliferescue #keystone #microbat #australianwildlife
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This gorgeous little girl is Milkshake, a juvenile black flying fox. At only four months old, Milkshake is still learning to navigate the complex and dangerous world around her. She had been feeding on a tasty fruiting street tree when she has gone to take off and been hit by a car. She has managed to climb off the road and half way up a tree where she stayed until someone spotted her the next day. Suffering from extreme stress and head trauma, shock quickly set it. It was touch and go for the first day as her carer tried to get her stable. We are pleased to report that Milkshake is now doing well and recovering from her knock to the head. She will have time to recover in care before being released back out into the wild. Hopefully a little more aware of the dangers cars pose!

Sometimes hitting an animal while driving is unavoidable. It’s what you do afterwards that counts. If you think you have hit an animal, pull over when safe and go back to check. Call a wildlife rescue immediately if you do locate an injured animal. It can be unpleasant but it’s the only ethical and responsible option.

A big thank you to Hans for sponsoring and naming Milkshake. This sponsorship will help us to pay for Milkshake's costs while in care. Milkshake is such a perfect name for this very sweet and gentle girl!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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Unfortunately being adorable does not prevent our flying foxes from becoming entangled on barbed wire. At only 12 weeks old, this baby boy may have been having his first night of flying when he collided with a near invisible barbed wire fence. His delicate wings became entangled on the barbs, leaving him at the mercy of a kind passerby spotting him and calling us in. This little one is one of the lucky ones, called in early the next morning and with damage to his wings that will heal up in time.

Please keep an eye out for animals caught on barbed wire as you are driving around. Never attempt to remove a bat off barbed wire yourself, give us or your closest wildlife rescue a call immediately. If you have a barbed wire fence check out ways to make it more wildlife friendly at the link below -

www.wildlifefriendlyfencing.com/WFF/Friendly_Fencing.html

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Rowan was just four months old when rescued from a fig tree with inappropriate netting over it. While her injuries will heal, this could have been prevented if wildlife friendly netting had been used. Please only use netting that you can’t poke your finger through, even the tip of your smallest finger.

Our sincere thanks to Danielle, who has sponsored Rowan who, like all bats caught in netting, must stay in care for at least three weeks. This is because netting-induced injuries can take this long to appear.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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With his dashing good looks and celebrity status, Flavi the yellow bellied sheathtail caused quite the stir when he was rescued. Found on a pool fence during the day, we suspect Flavi may have been belly dipping in the water and collided with the fence, bumping his head. Yellow bellied sheathtails are a rarity to get into care as they far prefer to live in bushland areas rather then around humans. Weighing over 50g they are able to fly tens of kilometres a night, flying high and foraging for flying insects. To put their size into perspective the smallest microbat we care for, the little forest bat, weighs just 4g! Flavi enjoyed the highlife while in care, taking full advantage of our meal worm buffet eating over 100 a night. Thankfully Flavis head bump was minor and we were able to get this boy released back where he was found within a week. Safe travels Flavi 🦇

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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