ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

Matcha the baby little red is styling this seasons baby bat fashion. Matcha is one of the babies who was recently rescued from Rockhampton and transported to us in Brisbane. We think a bird may have grabbed her by the wing and swung her, injuring her wing and foot. She was rescued just in the nick of time by a carer doing a sweep of the colony. Being a baby, Matcha loves to flap her wings but her sore wing needs to rest to heal. Her carer has made her a baby bat dress out of a children’s sock to stop her from using her wing. Matcha will need to stay in her dress for a few days until her wing is healed enough that she can flap to her hearts content.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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🦇 little red transport fundraiser🦇
We’ve had some very special little additions over the past week. Our friends at Bat Care Capricornia in Rockhampton started to find little red babies in terrible condition. We mobilised rehabilitators to help the small team up there ASAP. Unfortunately many were only able to be found after they had passed and the ones that were being rescued were hanging on by a thread, dehydrated and emaciated. The local rehabilitators were at capacity so we needed to get these babies to our trauma carers in Brisbane before it was too late. We organised a light aircraft to fly the babies, saving them over 12 hours of stress on the road. All of the babies were in very poor condition and are now being raised and rehabilitated with our experienced carers. Being able to fly these babies to Brisbane gave them the best chance of survival but it did not come cheap. Our total cost for the team and transport is $4,000 AUD. We are a volunteer organisation who is run off donations. We would really appreciate our followers support in reaching our fundraising target to cover this cost.

🦇🦇🦇 Donations can be made via our website at bats.org.au/get-involved/donate/ - your support is greatly appreciated! 🦇🦇🦇

The first photo shows a baby as she was found, clinging to life. The second photo shows this baby now after intensive stabilisation and TLC. Little reds have their babies in northern Australia so it’s very rare that we have little red babies in care here in Brisbane.

A shout out to our good friends at Bat Care Capricornia and the other groups who are helping with the rescue, transport and rehabilitation of these babies.
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This lovely girl is Chiyo, a subadult black flying-fox.
She flew out of a large fig tree and was lucky to be seen when she landed on a road. The lovely person safely bundled her up without touching her and gave us a call. She was very underweight and has a soft tissue injury to her bicep. This makes us think she may have fought off a predatory bird and had been in the fig tree recovering for a few days. On this evening, something made her attempt to fly and she found, to her dismay, that she could only glide.
As a subadult, she hasn’t had a baby yet, but it’s possible she’s pregnant with her first now.
She’ll be in care for many weeks, while her injury heals and she rebuilds her flight muscles so we’re extremely grateful to Tessa for sponsoring Chiyo as a birthday gift to her sister, Jenna. Happy birthday, Jenna. 🥳🎂

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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Dear little Clarence is a juvenile grey-headed flying-fox who was feeding in a lovely melaleuca and didn’t see a barbed wire fence as he flew off and unfortunately became entangled. Luckily there were quite a few people around and he was called in more than once.

Clarence’s wonderful sponsors, Cheryn and David, were among those caring people and they stayed with him until our rescuers arrived. Thank you sincerely for your generous sponsorship donation. 💕

Clarence’s injuries will heal with time and he’ll be released to continue his important ecological work of pollination and seed dispersal.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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When we first get a bat into care they are put to bed in a temperature controlled humidicrib. This helps to treat shock and gives our bats a well deserved rest. Some of our bats have injuries that mean they need to stay in bed for several weeks as they slowly regain enough strength to hang. As you can imagine, staying in a humidicrib all the time can be rather boring. Our bats need social interaction and mental stimulation in the same way that all intelligent animals do. For these bats we make them a little bat hammock so they can hang with the other bats and watch out the window. This hammock supports their weight so they are still resting while being able to visit friends and alleviate boredom.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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A few people are asking what the colourful hanging items in our videos are. These are toys for our babies! Flying foxes are very intelligent animals so they love to play as they grow. They particularly love toys with bells, that make sound or that they can hang and swing off. Playing is an important part of an animals development which helps them learn social skills, practice moving and climbing and can reduce the effect of stress throughout their lives. There was a study done on rats which found the more they played the larger and more quickly their brain grew! Scientists are still uncovering all of the benefits of play but one thing is for sure, it’s fun and our babies enjoy it!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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A big day for Spooky as he was released back into the wild! Spooky was found at a childcare center after he flew into a concrete pole and hit his head. He was named Spooky by the children at the childcare center. They got to learn about bats and how important it is not to touch them if you see one. Spooky has spent the past few weeks in our care healing from his knock to the head before being cleared for release back into the wild. He was released back into his local colony, hopefully a little more aware of the danger concrete poles pose.

All of our adult flying foxes are released directly back into their colonies during the day. This gives them a chance to get their bearings, relax and catch up with friends before they need to worry about foraging for the night.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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A lot of people don’t realize that our flying foxes don’t actually chew and eat their fruit. Instead they will chew the fruit, swallow the juice and spit out the pulp into what we call a spat. This is why you will see bats in our videos chewing for far longer than you would expect them to as they eat a piece of fruit. They aren’t chewing it just to be able to swallow it like we would; they are chewing and crushing the fruit to get all of the juice out. They have very flexible cheeks like a chipmunk so they can chew large pieces of fruit, using their foot as a hand to keep it in their mouth. Our bats are still able to disperse seeds by flying off to eat their fruit and from the seeds they accidentally ingest as they are chewing.

In this video we have Rhys, a very handsome young male flying fox we had in care last season. He’s feeding on some branches of native figs that are a natural part of our flying foxes diet. Rhys absolutely loved these figs and would pluck off enough figs to fill his cheeks and mouth before sitting back and chewing out all of the juice. You can see him spitting out the spat of dry pulp and seeds in this video. Rhys was successfully rehabilitated and released back into the wild.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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Bats are very clean animals. Like cats, they will spend hours of the day grooming and cleaning themselves. Their tongues are long and textured, which make them very useful for cleaning their soft fur and stretchy wing membranes. They are able to contort into weird and wonderful poses to access all of the hard to reach places! Our babies will attempt to start cleaning themselves from a young age. Even our very unwell bats on bed rest will attempt to groom and clean their wings while lying down. They hate being dirty so we make sure our babies and unwell bats are given baths and kept clean while in our care.

In the video we have Enchilada, one of last seasons babies. Enchilada is around 8 weeks old in this video so he is still learning to thoroughly clean himself. By around 10 weeks old they have the technique mastered and no longer need help from their carer.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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Ever wondered how flying foxes go to the bathroom? We call this inverting. Flying foxes will flip upside down and hold on to the roof with their thumbs. Even tiny babies that are only a few weeks old will try to invert when they go to the bathroom. The little one in the video is Quesadilla, one of last seasons babies who was around 10 weeks old when this was filmed. Quesadilla has gone through our crèche program and been released back into the wild.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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