ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

Just after rescue vs 6 weeks of treatment! This stunning boy is Manicotti, a baby grey headed flying fox. Manicotti was rescued from the palms with a severe melting eye ulcer. Fearing the worst, his carer took him to the RSPCA QLD to be assessed to see if his eye could be saved. The wonderful vets at the rspca wanted to give Manicotti a chance so they created a plasma eye drop from his own blood for his carer to put in his eye 4x each day. Over the course of 6 weeks his carer medicated his eye 4x a day with different eye drops to stimulate healing and prevent infection. He had a number of follow up appointments at the rspca where the vets continued to treat this severe ulcer. Through all of this Manicotti was a star patient and won his carers and the rspcas hearts alike. We have been blown away by how well Manicottis eye has healed and are thrilled that he has now been cleared for release. A massive thank you to the rspca wildlife hospital for giving Manicotti a chance and their top tier vet care that made his recovery possible.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

We have a lovely update for Amethyst and her adopted son Antaresia. Amethyst tragically lost her baby to a python who nearly got the best of Amethyst as well. She was very stressed and fearful when she initially came in to care but calmed significantly after she adopted Antaresia. Little Antaresia was rescued from the same colony as Amethyst and was very distressed without his mother. Both bats were very fearful but have found comfort with each other. Despite Amethyst immediately nursing Antaresia we were still unsure of the longevity of this adoption. We are so pleased to say that it has now been over 3 weeks and the pair are still together. Adoptions are rare in flying foxes so we have really enjoyed seeing this pair together.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Kiwi is a first flyer, which means he’s one of this season’s babies who’s about three months old and is just starting to learn to forage and about the ways of the world. He had some sort of misadventure and one night he found himself crawling across a road near the entrance to a hospital emergency department. Nice try, Kiwi, but we don’t think those doctors could help you. One of our dedicated rescuers took him to the RSPCA where a wildlife vet checked him over before discharging him into our care next day.

Kiwi is on the thin side and has some skin scraped off from the bitumen on the road. When he’s a healthy weight and his injuries are healed, he’ll be soft released with our hand-raised orphans.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This beautiful older lady is Sotoria, the black flying fox. Sotoria was found by a kind passerby, hanging at the base of a tree next to a dog park. Poor Sotoria was in a very bad way, suffering from paralysis syndrome. She had been weak and unable to feed for some time as she was extremely emaciated and dehydrated. Sotoria was touch and go as her carer tried to get sustenance in to her with the paralysis syndrome making her very weak and unable to swallow normally. A lot of TLC later and the lovely Sotoria is well on her way to a full recovery. It takes our bats quite a while to fully recover and regain their strength from paralysis syndrome so Sotoria will be spending a few more weeks in our care before she can be released. For those that haven't been following us long, paralysis syndrome is a toxicity of unknown origin.

We are yet to experience the large numbers of bats experiencing paralysis syndrome that we had at this time last year. Although some have been rescued in our region, numbers are significantly lower and we are very much hoping it remains this way.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This little fashionista is Lilith, the baby black flying fox. Lilith was rescued one morning from the emergency event at the palms where hundreds of baby flying foxes have been rescued over the past couple of months. Poor Lilith didn’t come out of the Palms unscathed, likely having a run in with a predator that left her with a broken wrist. The wonderful vets at the RSPCA treated Lilith and advised that she can’t use her broken wrist until it has healed to avoid further damage. Here in comes the bat dress! One of our talented trauma carers hand sewed these dresses for Lilith to ensure a perfect and comfortable fit while shes healing. Lilith does not let the immobilisation of one of her wings get her down and is one of the most cheeky and confident babies in the aviary. Lilith will have another appointment at the RSPCA to check how her break is healing and we are hoping she does not need to wear her dresses for much longer!

We are also very pleased to report that rescues from the Palms have slowed significantly and seem to have ceased. This is an incredible relief to all involved in this massive emergency event.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This gorgeous little girl is Pippa, a baby grey headed flying fox. Pippa is one of the near 300 baby grey headed flying foxes that have been rescued from the ongoing situation at the palms. The cause of the females disappearing from the colony is still unknown but we have rescuers making the drive out there every day to rescue babies. Most babies are found like Pippa here, low to the ground and calling for their mothers. These babies are skinny and many have injuries from falling and escaping predators. We are glad that sweet Pippa is only a bit skinny and dehydrated and will recover well in care.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This little man is Rowan, the baby black flying fox. Rowan was waiting in the camp for his mum when she didn’t return from foraging one night. Rowan waited and waited, growing more and more hungry. Mother flying foxes don’t abandon their babies so sadly we suspect Rowan’s mum has been killed or injured while out for the night. Eventually Rowan grew so desperate he attempted to fly out of the camp himself. Rowan is too young to sustain flight so he didn’t get far before he ended up low to the ground. Unfortunately a homeowner had not contained their dog in their house at night and the dog grabbed Rowan. Hearing Rowans distressed screams, the homeowners came outside and were able to stop their dog from injuring him further. Rowan was extremely emaciated and had extensive damage to his wings from the dog biting him. Amazingly the dog did not manage to do any damage that Rowan will be unable to heal with time in care. Rowan is quickly putting on weight and healing the damage to his wings. He will be soft released once he is fully healed and old enough to sustain himself in the wild.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

When your best friend is more beautiful than you… this little pair is Stormy and Silbers, both grey headed flying foxes rescued from the palms as part of the ongoing emergency. Poor little Stormy has had some ongoing tummy problems that have made her look a little disheveled. After some ongoing treatment by the rspca she is now on the mend. This pair were rescued on the same day and have become inseparable in care. Bats are incredibly social animals and form strong bonds with each other. They do have best friends and on the flip side, bats they dislike. Stormy and Silbers will be released together so we hope their friendship will survive out in the wild.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Two of our rescuers were doing our daily sweep of the palms camp when they found a carpet python in the process of constricting a female and baby grey headed flying fox. The python was just next to the path so when our rescuers walked past, the python was spooked and slithered off, leaving the bats behind. Sadly the baby had already passed but the mum was still alive. After getting the all clear from the rspca and having a couple of days of bed rest, the mum named Amethyst, was put up in our rehabbers aviary. Amazingly when our rehabber checked on the bats the next morning, Amethyst had adopted one of the newly rescued babies from her same colony. Both bats were quite scared but have calmed significantly now that Amethyst has adopted the little boy. It is rare that flying foxes adopt babies that are not their own so this has been very heartwarming to witness. We are unsure if this will be a permanent adoption or if they are just getting much needed comfort from each other as they settle in to care.

We are saddened that Amethysts baby died but predation by pythons is a natural part of the food chain. Snakes are an important part of the ecosystem and we would never malign an animal for doing what they are meant to do.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Pre-creche is underway! Our earliest rescued orphans are now weaned and on their next step on their journey to the wild.
These three pretty black flying fox girls are Phoenix, Arya and Nightingale, on the day they arrived. They're being greeted by Ghost, a grey-headed flying fox orphan, who’s an old hand, having arrived the day before. 😉 They settle in very quickly.
These babies will spend a month or so in pre-creche. They’ll practice their flying, learn to live in social groups, and begin their wilding with minimal human contact. There are adult bats who are rehabilitating in the aviary with them who will teach them valuable lessons in batty ways.
(Sorry about the plane going over. Sound down.)

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook