ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

Following on from our fruit tree netting rescue at the home of a beekeeper, we’ve been called to another most unusual rescue: a bat on the platform of a container crane, around 30m (100 feet) high.
Sadly this Little Red Flying-fox boy’s injuries suggested he’d been taken by a predatory bird, possibly a sea eagle, and he’d bravely fought the bird until it dropped him, and he landed on the crane. His injuries were unfortunately not survivable and our rescuer took him to be humanely and peacefully put to rest.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This lovely boy is Snoop, named in honour of a beloved pooch who sadly passed last week.
Snoop has had a run of bad luck.
He was called in to us by a caring man who saw him on the ground in his front yard. He has skin off his lower lip and chin and is underweight so he may have flown into something and was too dazed to be able to find food for a day or so. On top of that he has three small injuries to his wings that suggest he was lightly entangled on a barbed wire fence and got himself off. By the amount of healing, it would have been about two weeks ago.
And finally, he has some nicks out of each ear, which could be bites from another bat or a possum.
This boy has some stories to tell!
You can see he *loves* smoothie, our nutritionally complete liquid diet that we give to our rehabbing flying-foxes. He’s working on regaining his lost weight most diligently!
Just like his batty namesake, doggy Snoop was full of life, adventurous and cheeky and packed a lot into his too-short seven years.
If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This pretty girl is Tad, the white striped freetail bat. Tad was found in the mouth of a dog after the owner heard a ruckus at night. Thankfully the owner was able to get their dog to drop Tad before they could do any serious harm. Knowing that Tad was likely injured, the owner called the RSPCA out to help. Tad was treated for minor injuries at the RSPCA before being transferred to us to continue her care. We are pleased to report that Tad has quickly recovered from her injuries and has been released back where she was found. We wish Tad safe travels as she continues her important work munching insects.

Not many people realise how harmful our pet dogs can be for wildlife. We advocate for dogs to be allowed to sleep inside at night to reduce their impact on nocturnal wildlife. Tad was extremely lucky, but so many animals do not share her luck. Ensure your much loved pets are not impacting on our native wildlife.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬

#bcrq #flyingfox #brisbane #queensland #notouchnorisk #fruitbat #bat #australia #wild #wildlife #wildliferescue #keystone #microbat #australianwildlife
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This gorgeous little girl is Milkshake, a juvenile black flying fox. At only four months old, Milkshake is still learning to navigate the complex and dangerous world around her. She had been feeding on a tasty fruiting street tree when she has gone to take off and been hit by a car. She has managed to climb off the road and half way up a tree where she stayed until someone spotted her the next day. Suffering from extreme stress and head trauma, shock quickly set it. It was touch and go for the first day as her carer tried to get her stable. We are pleased to report that Milkshake is now doing well and recovering from her knock to the head. She will have time to recover in care before being released back out into the wild. Hopefully a little more aware of the dangers cars pose!

Sometimes hitting an animal while driving is unavoidable. It’s what you do afterwards that counts. If you think you have hit an animal, pull over when safe and go back to check. Call a wildlife rescue immediately if you do locate an injured animal. It can be unpleasant but it’s the only ethical and responsible option.

A big thank you to Hans for sponsoring and naming Milkshake. This sponsorship will help us to pay for Milkshake's costs while in care. Milkshake is such a perfect name for this very sweet and gentle girl!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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Unfortunately being adorable does not prevent our flying foxes from becoming entangled on barbed wire. At only 12 weeks old, this baby boy may have been having his first night of flying when he collided with a near invisible barbed wire fence. His delicate wings became entangled on the barbs, leaving him at the mercy of a kind passerby spotting him and calling us in. This little one is one of the lucky ones, called in early the next morning and with damage to his wings that will heal up in time.

Please keep an eye out for animals caught on barbed wire as you are driving around. Never attempt to remove a bat off barbed wire yourself, give us or your closest wildlife rescue a call immediately. If you have a barbed wire fence check out ways to make it more wildlife friendly at the link below -

www.wildlifefriendlyfencing.com/WFF/Friendly_Fencing.html

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Rowan was just four months old when rescued from a fig tree with inappropriate netting over it. While her injuries will heal, this could have been prevented if wildlife friendly netting had been used. Please only use netting that you can’t poke your finger through, even the tip of your smallest finger.

Our sincere thanks to Danielle, who has sponsored Rowan who, like all bats caught in netting, must stay in care for at least three weeks. This is because netting-induced injuries can take this long to appear.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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With his dashing good looks and celebrity status, Flavi the yellow bellied sheathtail caused quite the stir when he was rescued. Found on a pool fence during the day, we suspect Flavi may have been belly dipping in the water and collided with the fence, bumping his head. Yellow bellied sheathtails are a rarity to get into care as they far prefer to live in bushland areas rather then around humans. Weighing over 50g they are able to fly tens of kilometres a night, flying high and foraging for flying insects. To put their size into perspective the smallest microbat we care for, the little forest bat, weighs just 4g! Flavi enjoyed the highlife while in care, taking full advantage of our meal worm buffet eating over 100 a night. Thankfully Flavis head bump was minor and we were able to get this boy released back where he was found within a week. Safe travels Flavi 🦇

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Dear little April was four months old when rescued on 1st April (no joke 😊 ) from a barbed wire fence. It wasn’t near a flowering tree. She was just unlucky flying through a commercial area and didn’t see it. She has injuries to her left wing and right wrist, both of which will heal nicely, however the wrist injury feels odd to her and she’s been licking it, slowing down the healing. That’s why, once she was well enough to continue her rehab in a flight aviary, she’s been wearing this stylish sling, made from a sock, to cover her wrist. She’s perfectly able to eat, toilet and move around the aviary. Once her wrist is healed, we’ll remove the sock-sling and she will build up her flight muscles til she’s ready for release.

April is shown here resting in an ICU on the evening of her rescue and later in a flight aviary with her friend, Rowan, whose story we will post shortly. They are the same age and like to spend time together. 🦇💕

A big thank you to Marion and Dave for sponsoring this girl, helping us to pay for her costs while in care.

Please check any barbed wire fences in your area for tangled wildlife and call a rescue group if you see anything. For bats, please call us immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This sweet boy is Houdini, a black flying fox. Houdini was discovered on the ground by a family dog sniffing around in the backyard. Thankfully the dog didn’t engage Houdini and alerted his owners to his presence. The owners did the right thing and gave us a call straight away to rescue him. Houdini was rescued from a beautifully leafy backyard with lots of tasty native species. We suspect Houdini has been feeding in the yard, had a scuffle with another bat, fallen to the ground and bumped his head. It’s breeding season at the moment so testosterone levels are high! We are thankful that Houdini has come away with only a mild concussion and will make a full recovery with some TLC in care.

A big thank you to Sasha for sponsoring this lovely boy which will help us pay for his expenses while in care.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Djuk-koo (pronounced goo-goo) is a late season orphan. She was found in a small rural town north-west of Brisbane hanging on a clothes line. She was around 8 weeks old. It was not too far from a camp so we think her mum left her in the camp while she went out to forage, which is normal for a baby of Djuk-koo’s age, but something unfortunate happened to her mum that she couldn’t come back to Djuk-koo. After a day or so, poor Djuk-koo was left with no choice but to head out on her own to try and find food. Being so young and only just able to fly, she didn’t get very far. The lovely caller covered the clothesline to protect the baby from rain and was sitting under there with her when our rescuer arrived. He’s indigenous and rang his grandmother to ask about a name for her. Her name means flying-fox in Gurgurri language.

Djuk-koo is available to be symbolically adopted. We request a donation of AUD$90 and you'll receive a pdf adoption certificate and our sincere thanks. Please comment "adopted" if you'd like to adopt her and we'll be in touch.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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