ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

This lovely little girl is Buffy, a juvenile black flying fox. Buffy was found crawling around on the ground near a shopping centre one evening. Knowing this is not normal behaviour, a kind passerby gave us a call to rescue her. The shopping centre is next to a park and the building she was near had big glass windows. We think it’s likely that Buffy hasn’t seen the glass and flown into a window, knocking her head. Thankfully apart from being a little dazed and sore, she has escaped any major injury. She will stay in our care until she is feeling 100% and can be released back into the wild.

Thank you to Pamela for sponsoring this little girl! This sponsorship will allow us to pay for Buffy’s costs while she is in care recovering.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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This pretty little juvenile grey headed flying fox girl is Bea. At only 3 months old this little girl is only just starting to explore the world around her. She should still be nursing off her mum as she adapts to her natural diet of fruit and nectar. Unfortunately Bea was feeding on some tasty flowering shrubs when she has flown into a near invisible barbed wire fence. Her wings have become seriously entangled and she has made the damage worse in her efforts to escape. Thankfully someone spotted Bea in time and we were able to send a rescuer out to remove her from the fence and bring her into care. Bea was absolutely exhausted by her ordeal and spent her first couple of days in care solidly sleeping in a warm bed. She will be in our care for some time as her wings heal.

A big thank you to Sammy for sponsoring Bea in honour of her late grandmother Bea. We think this is a beautiful way to honour her grandmother. Even though human Bea has passed, a life has been saved in her name and her memory will be kept alive as Bea flies through the sky at night.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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Sweet little Nadia is a juvenile black flying-fox girl who didn’t see a clear glass pool fence as she flew up after having a drink. Flying-foxes drink by flying low over water, wetting their bellies, then licking them. It's called belly-dipping.
Sadly, clear glass pool fences are becoming more popular and, as they do, rescue calls we receive for bats that have flown into these fences are also increasing.
If you have a clear glass pool fence, please consider hanging something on it, or sticking something to it near the top, to make it visible to wildlife.
We are very grateful to Paula and Bruce for sponsoring Nadia, in honour of animal lover Nadia’s birthday. Happy birthday, Nadia. 🎁🎂
Batty Nadia is recovering well. She'll stay in care until we're sure she's completely healed and ready to be back in the wild.
If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This sweet little eastern freetail is Howdy. He was discovered in an auto repair shop after they heard some newspaper crinkling. This was not the first bat they had found so they knew to give us a call straight away. This repair shop used to have a colony inside and they would commonly get bats trapped and getting up to mischief. We were able to work with the repair shop by providing a bat box on the outside of the building which the bats have started using! Unfortunately there was a small hole they had missed that Howdy had managed to get into. Howdy was in a very bad way and we weren’t sure if he was going to make it. Thankfully after some expert care by one of our microbat carers, he has bounced back and is on the mend. The hole has been sealed and he will be able to join his family in their bat box when he’s put on a bit more weight. A massive thank you to Howdy auto repairs for working with us which resulted in the best outcome for bats and humans. Hopefully Howdy will be the last bat to find their way inside!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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This lovely boy is William and he was rescued in the nick of time. He was found on the ground and called in to us by a caring person. He was unconscious, very close to the end, and fortunately was rushed to our Senior Trauma Carer whose urgent intensive care brought him back from the brink. He’s recovering beautifully now and just needs time in a flight aviary with batty company to regain weight and rebuild strength before he’ll be ready to be released back where he belongs.

We'd be very grateful for a sponsor for this boy to cover his costs while in care. We suggest a donation of AUD$90 and we'd love his sponsor to give him a name. We'll send you an electronic sponsorship certificate and our sincere thanks.
Your donation is tax deductible in Australia.
Update: Thank you Caroline. This boy has been sponsored. <3

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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Here's dear little Sophie showing you her good side. Sophie is a juvenile black flying-fox who sadly was caught on barbed wire near a fruiting shrub. Barbed wire injuries to delicate wing membrane are bad enough, but poor little Sophie was caught by her mouth and cheek. 😔
That's Milkshake coming over to check out the new kid in the second photo.
Sophie will be in care for some months while her mouth heals. We are extremely grateful to human Sophie for sponsoring her. Thank you! 💕
We've been in touch with the fence owners - both sides - to see if they'll allow us to remove the barbed wire or place some tags to try to prevent this happening again.
If you see a bat caught on barbed wire, or any fence, it's not just resting there. It's stuck.
Please call us immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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We are so pleased to announce that all of our in season orphans have been released! Once our babies have been lovingly raised to a certain size, they leave their carers and go to our big flight aviary. They then go through a release program that we call crèche. They spend a couple of weeks in the flight aviary practicing their flying and social skills before the hatch is opened and they are free to come and go. Our aviary is near a flying fox camp so our babies start visiting this camp as they practice foraging in the wild. We continue to supply a fruit buffet every night until the babies stop coming. This can take several weeks as they learn their natural diet. Nectar and native fruit is far tastier than commercial fruit so they stop coming as soon as they are able to find enough food for themselves.

A big thank you to everyone who symbolically adopted one of our orphans this season! Our fruit buffet isn’t cheap so your donation allows us to give our babies the support they need as they find their feet in the wild.

The only babies we now still have in care are a few late season stragglers who will also be released shortly 🦇

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Meet the very handsome Spooky, a Black Flying-fox adult boy named by the children at the childcare centre where he was found. Poor Spooky was flying in a leafy area and flew into a concrete post which he didn’t see in time to avoid. His breathing was laboured and we were very concerned for him. However after doing several large coughs, he started breathing normally and has been ever since. We think he had a piece of chewed up food, called a spat, in his mouth which got partially lodged in his throat in the collision.
He has a cut on his nose, above his left nostril, but is otherwise uninjured.
And the children learnt how important bats are, and if they see one, to not touch it and tell an adult. 🦇

A big thank you to Linda for sponsoring this handsome boy!

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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We had a wonderful day at the leaf festival over the weekend! Education is critical to the work that we do so we were excited to be able to start attending events again. Our education boys Sooty and Stephen were very popular, allowing people to see our beautiful flying foxes up close. We had volunteers on hand to answer the many questions about our bats and the work that we do.

A big thank you to our lovely events coordinator and all of the volunteers who helped out on the day. By all reports it was a very successful and educational day 🦇
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This adorable little man would have been born in early-to-mid March. Since most flying-fox babies are born in October to December, it makes him a late or out-of-season baby.
He was spotted hanging in a low bush and called in to us by the lovely man who saw him. He’s around 8 weeks old.
He spent time in a warm bed at first while he regained lost weight, and is now in a flight aviary. With no other orphans his age, a bevy of juvenile girls have taken him under their wings, so to speak, including April, Indiana and Milkshake, and Rowan earlier on but she’s now been released. ❤
He’s also learning important skills from some adult boys, including Snoop and Dougal.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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