ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


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There has been a lot of conjecture and assumptions over the past few months in regards to covid-19 and bats. We’ve received messages from concerned people so thought we would clear up a few things that we currently know.

Unfortunately bats are already being unfairly persecuted around the world due to misinformation regarding covid-19.

Some quick facts –

• As a background people and bats have lived together for thousands of years;

• There is still no clear evidence that covid-19 came from bats;

• Even if it did come from bats, it likely came through another host animal, not directly to
humans;

• Viruses such as Ebola, SARS etc have occurred where humans have poached wild animals or encroached on their natural habitats. The wild animals have then been kept alive in unsanitary and stressful conditions and killed for food or products;

• Many animals carry Coronaviruses (not specifically covid-19) including cats, dogs, pigs and other domestic animals;

• Bats are essential to the ecosystem. They are seed dispersers, pollinators and help to reduce pest insect populations. They are important and have ecosystem and economic value; and,

• Covid-19 has not been found in any species of Australian bat. There is more of a risk of us passing the disease to them.

Our advice remains the same. If you find a bat, do not touch it. If the bat is by itself during the day give us or your local wildlife rescue a call. Please let your friends and families know of these facts and the importance of bats. As world-renowned British primatologist Jane Goodall recently stated “the Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic was caused by humanity’s disregard for nature and disrespect for animals”.

We hope that everyone is keeping safe, healthy and at home at this time. Our rescue service has been listed as essential so please give us a call if you find a bat in distress.
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This is why we do what we do! Lovely Rhubarb here is a little red flying fox. She became entangled on a barbed wire fence between two flowering trees. Thankfully someone spotted Rhubarb and called us in to help her. Rhubarb had damage to her wings but after some time in care this damage has healed up nicely. Rhubarb has been released just in time to head north with the rest of the little red flying foxes. This species over winters in the north where the temperatures are warmer for them to give birth and raise their babies. Unlike other flying fox species, little reds give birth in winter rather then in spring. Little Rhubarb is still too young for a baby of her own this year but we hope she stays safe and has the opportunity next year. Safe travels Rhubarb!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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This darling girl is Plum, a black flying fox. Some keen eyed members of the public spotted Plum struggling in the water of an unused swimming pool. They used quick thinking and without touching her, used a long branch to fish her out and then covered her with a box. They called us in to rescue and asses her. Poor little Plum was completely exhausted from her ordeal and will be monitored in care for pneumonia. Big thanks to the people who fished her out and called us in to rescue her. They saved this little girls life! Plum will be released back into the wild once she gets the all clear. If you have a swimming pool, it’s a great idea to purchase a ‘frog log’ which will allow trapped wildlife to exit the pool.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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We have been working very hard behind the scenes on a brand new and improved website. The new website has lots of new batty information and a streamlined membership process. Check it out and let us know what you think!

www.bats.org.au

Photography by the incredible Doug Gimesy Photography

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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This sweet little boy is Normie, a baby black flying fox. Normie was spotted hanging on a low fence not far from a flying fox camp. At less than 8 weeks old Normie should still be in the camp being fed and tended to by his mum. We think that something has happened to his mum and little Normie has grown desperate and tried to go out on his own. Thankfully someone spotted him, realised something was wrong and gave us a call. Normie was severely under weight and was touch and go for a little bit. He is starting to look a lot stronger now and through the woods. Normie will stay in care until he is old enough to be soft released back out into the wild where he belongs.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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We try to keep things positive here on our social media but little Hootie’s story was too important not to share. Hootie started his night how he always did, foraging for tasty insects around suburbia. Unfortunately on this night, someone was irresponsible and allowed their pet cat outside at night. Hootie was captured, severely injured and left to die by this cat. A homeowner saw Hootie struggling on the ground the next day and called us in to help. Hootie had puncture wounds from the cats needle sharp teeth on his tiny body. The wildlife hospital decided to give Hootie a chance and he was cared for by his rescuer. Hootie was a fighter but unfortunately his little body just couldn’t withstand the damage the cat had done. The heartbreaking decision was made to humanely put him to rest. Domestic cats kill and maim a variety of wildlife as they are irresponsibility left to roam. Cats should be kept inside or enclosed 24/7 but at an absolute minimum between dusk and dawn. Domestic cats are not a part of any natural ecosystem so their hunting is not a natural part of the food chain. Be a responsible pet owner and ensure you are not contributing to the unnecessary death of our precious native wildlife. RIP little Hootie, fly free 🦇

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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Do you live in south east Queensland and would love to help out our bats? We are on the hunt for new volunteers for a range of positions. As we are completely volunteer run, volunteers are absolutely essential for us to continue our work helping bats. We have two volunteer types, active and support. Active volunteers are vaccinated, hands on with bats and help to rescue, rehabilitate or raise orphaned babies. Support volunteers are hands off and may operate the rescue phone line, help us at education days, cutting fruit for bats in care or help us with fundraising. You can be as much or as little involved as you want, there is no obligation. Get in touch via our new website if this is something you think you might be interested in. We find that once you start getting involved with bats you fall in love with them 🦇

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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Another video of Inari, the juvenile black flying fox whose story we shared on Monday. In the wild flying fox mums are very tactile and loving mothers. They spend time grooming their babies, similar to a cat with her kittens. We find that our rescued babies love being stroked and patted, especially around their face and neck. Being wrapped in a mumma roll and gently stroked calms them right down. We also don’t need to worry about humanising them as they forget all about the nice humans as their instincts take over with the other bats in the flight aviary. Inari is currently in the flight aviary with other babies his own age and adult bats being rehabilitated to show them the ropes. Inari will be released in the not too distant future through our crèche program!

**all of our rescuers and rehabbers are fully vaccinated, never touch a bat yourself**

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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These two little trouble makers are Aladdin and Jasmine, a pair of broad nosed bats. This cute couple were found on a rolled carpet in a carpet store by an observant member of the public. We were called in to assist and check them over. The rescuer, also a microbat rehabilitator, determined that they were uninjured and just mildly dehydrated. They were rehydrated and released shortly after. Hopefully they’ll find a more suitable roost to spend their days together.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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This lucky little boy is Inari, a juvenile black flying fox. One of our rescuers was called in for a dog attack rescue, something that is far too common. Dog attacked flying foxes have an extremely low success rate which is why we recommend that dogs sleep inside at night. When our rescuer arrived she was expecting the usual injuries but was instead greeted by this lovely uninjured juvenile! Poor little Inari was absolutely terrified though and was starting to go into shock. We think that little Inari, still learning to fly, has crash landed and had the family dog find him on the ground. The house owners heard him screaming and rushed out to save his life by restraining their dog. Baby Inari was very shaken up and spent the night having some ribena and small pieces of fruit in bed. He was starting to feel a lot better the next day once he realised he was warm, safe and being offered tasty fruit. Being so young and a bit thin it was decided that it would be best for Inari to go through our crèche program. Inari is now in a flight aviary where he will have lots of friends the same age and get a head start for life back out in the wild.

**all of our rescuers and rehabbers are fully vaccinated**

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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