ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

This lucky little boy is Inari, a juvenile black flying fox. One of our rescuers was called in for a dog attack rescue, something that is far too common. Dog attacked flying foxes have an extremely low success rate which is why we recommend that dogs sleep inside at night. When our rescuer arrived she was expecting the usual injuries but was instead greeted by this lovely uninjured juvenile! Poor little Inari was absolutely terrified though and was starting to go into shock. We think that little Inari, still learning to fly, has crash landed and had the family dog find him on the ground. The house owners heard him screaming and rushed out to save his life by restraining their dog. Baby Inari was very shaken up and spent the night having some ribena and small pieces of fruit in bed. He was starting to feel a lot better the next day once he realised he was warm, safe and being offered tasty fruit. Being so young and a bit thin it was decided that it would be best for Inari to go through our crèche program. Inari is now in a flight aviary where he will have lots of friends the same age and get a head start for life back out in the wild.

**all of our rescuers and rehabbers are fully vaccinated**

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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*Important information*

As the restrictions surrounding corona virus continue to change, we just wanted to make it clear that at this point in time we are continuing to operate as usual. If we are forced to change our processes in the future, we will post an update with details. So please, if you find a bat in distress do not hesitate to call our hotline. If you are in quarantine, unwell or concerned at all please let our phone operator know and we can make arrangements. Please also respect social distancing while our rescuers are attending your rescue.

There is no evidence that covid 19 occurs in any Australian wildlife.

We hope everyone is staying safe and staying home as much as possible. Lovely Buttercup here is demonstrating a very relaxed breakfast in bed, a perfect activity for the current situation!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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Welcome to our first species feature! This is where we highlight one of our Australian bat species. For our first feature we have an eastern horseshoe bat, a species found all along the east coast of Australia. This species traditionally roosts in caves but has adapted well to sheltered culverts and old mine tunnels. They have this lovely appendage on their nose called a nose leaf. This helps refine their echolocation as they search for insects to eat. Echolocation is where microbats produce a pulse of sound, usually at a pitch too high for the human ear to hear. This pulse rebounds off objects letting the microbat know where these objects are around it depending how its pulse rebounded. Fortunately eastern horseshoe bats don’t come into care too often but there are a couple of ways you can help these excellent bats. Don’t disturb bat roosts by walking into caves and tunnels where bats are present. Disturbance can be deadly for bats. And keep your cats enclosed 24/7 and your dogs locked inside at night. Many bats are injured and killed by domestic pets that aren’t being kept responsibly.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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Nara, an orphaned grey headed flying fox, enjoying a slice of banana. Nara is one of the greys we took in from the fires and droughts in NSW late last year which caused hundreds of babies to need care. Little Nara was very emotionally traumatised from her ordeal but soon settled into care with her carer. Grey headed flying foxes are a federally listed threatened species so we did everything we could to take on large numbers of these babies and return them to the wild where they belong. Nara is currently at creche where she is practicing her flying, socialisation and becoming dehumanised in preparation for her release.

**all of our rescuers and rehabbers are fully vaccinated**

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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This post is a massive thank you to everyone who has sewn us wraps and pouches, recently or in the past. We use mumma rolls for our flying fox babies to simulate them holding on to their mum with her wings wrapped around them. These rolls make them feel safe and secure, they are essential to raise our orphans. Every single one of our mumma rolls and microbat pouches have been handmade and donated by people who spend their own time and money sewing. We are incredibly grateful for the generosity these people have shown, especially with our influx of grey orphans this year due to the drought and fires. People have been so generous that we, for the first time ever, have spare mumma rolls that we will be able to provide to new carers this season and use in the case of emergency if we get an influx of babies. This will be wonderful for our new carers and gives us peace of mind that we will have lovely clean babies in large transport events. So thank you again to everyone who has donated, we will be able to use these mumma rolls and pouches for seasons to come.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions
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This is Frank, a baby black flying fox. Baby Frank was spotted on some overhead powerlines by a young girl on her way to school. Thankfully she alerted someone immediately who then gave us a call. As we can’t go near powerlines ourselves, we called in Energex. Energex are fantastic and get out to help us rescue bats off powerlines as quickly as they can. An Energex worker went up in a cherry picker and retrieved a very distressed baby Frank. We aren’t quite sure how he ended up on powerlines but there was no mum in sight. After baby Frank was wrapped up and given a dummy he calmed down and went to sleep. The last photo is Frank just before he was moved to crèche. Frank thrived in care with his rehabber and is now learning to fly and socialise in preparation for release.

**all of our rescuers and rehabbers are fully vaccinated**

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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As our babies grow and are able to try different fruits, we try to introduce as much native fruit as possible. This is generally quite difficult as its not commercially produced but its an absolute treat when we can get it. One of our carers managed to collect some strangler fig fruits from a tree being cut down for development, a common story in southeast Queensland. The babies in her care all thoroughly enjoyed the treat though, especially little Taro here. Once released, these babies will be the primary long distance seed disperser for our native figs. This ensures the populations remain genetically diverse and able to thrive.

**all of our rescuers and rehabbers are fully vaccinated**
Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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A before and after of one of this seasons microbat babies. This is Little Fang, a goulds wattled bat. Little Fang came into care after he was found on the ground by a young family out on a walk. Thankfully they realized something was wrong and gave us a call straight away. Little Fang was just a baby at 4g so we think he may have fallen from his roost high up in the hollow of a tree. He had some minor injuries but was otherwise unharmed. Little Fang has been raised in care by one of our microbat carers. They require frequent tiny feeds with a specialist milk recipe. Little Fang has been in care for a few weeks now and is reaching adult size. Very soon he will be moved to the microbat crèche where he will learn to fly and catch insects in preparation for release.

***all of our rescuers and rehabbers are fully vaccinated***
Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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Unlike microbats, flying foxes roost out in the open in large colonies during the day. They are exposed to large amounts of sunlight as they rest, bicker and socialize. Our babies raised in care also need sunlight for their development. Sunlight on skin produces vitamin D, especially important for strong bones as the babies grow. We provide our babies with at least half an hour of time in the sun each day in the early morning or late afternoon when it isn’t too hot. Time outside also helps them get used to the sights and sounds of the wild, as this is where they are going to live once they are released. They usually love their outside time and stretch their wings out and have a lovely sunbake.

***all of our rescuers and rehabbers are fully vaccinated***
Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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This is Pluto Pup, a baby black flying fox. Pluto Pup was still learning how to fly when he got himself into a bit of trouble. He was found hanging low in a shrub by a concerned member of the public. This lovely man did the absolute best that he could for Pluto Pup by giving us a call and sitting quietly near him until our rescuer arrived. This made sure that if Pluto Pup climbed away our rescuer would still be able to find him when they arrived. Pluto Pup seems to have a bit of a concussion so he may have been clipped by a car or may have flown into something as he is still learning. He is in care with us now and will enjoy our fruit buffet until he is cleared for release back into the wild.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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