ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

This tiny bat with a voracious appetite is Lincoln the Gould's wattled bat. Lincoln thought he had found an amazing spot to spend his day, tucked up inside an air conditioning unit. When workers turned the unit on they heard his cries of distress and were able to see him inside. Thankfully they gave us a call to rescue Lincoln as he had been injured when the unit was turned on. Lincoln had some bruising and damage to his wing but to our relief, nothing was broken. He has spent the past couple of weeks thoroughly enjoying our meal worm buffet and the company of his bestie, Chicken Nugget (previously posted on our page). We are so pleased to report that Lincoln has made a full recovery and has now been released back in to the wild. Hopefully he will be choosing more suitable roosts in the future.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬
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This ridiculously cute face belongs to Reggie, an adult grey-headed flying fox. Like birds in the day time, flying foxes can see reflections in glass at night and not realize they are reflections and so fly into them. This is what happened to poor Reggie on the 11th floor of an apartment building. Confused, he climbed up in amongst some laundry drying on an airer and hung there while he tried to figure out where he was. Later he tried to fly off but was stumped again by a glass balcony railing. He ended up stuck between a pot plant and the railing, feeling quite annoyed at his predicament.

Happily his only injury was to his pride and a scratch on his nose, possibly from one the strap-leaves on that plant. Reggie only needed a fairly short time in care, just to make sure all was well. He is now flying free again having hopefully learnt a lesson about reflective glass on tall buildings.

If you have sliding doors, balcony railings or a pool fence made out of glass, please consider attaching decals to make them visible to wildlife.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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Let us introduce you to Strawberry the Black Flying Fox. Strawberry is a first flier meaning she was last summers baby. Strawberry had been attacked by a raptor, quite likely an owl. Flying foxes have many predators including pythons, crocodiles, goannas, owls, sea-eagles and humans. While predation is a completely natural and normal part of the ecosystem, we are still so glad that strawberry was able to escape. Strawberry skillfully evaded her attacker, finding safety in a small bushy tree. Too scared to make an escape, she stayed in the tree till a gentleman found her and called her into the rescue. Strawberry was a little shaken up and had obtained a couple injuries from the attack so she will receive care for a short time before being released.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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This sweet little girl is Flora, a juvenile black flying fox. Flora is a late baby from last season at around 4 months old. Sweet Flora was out trying to find some flowers to feed on when she flew into a barbed wire fence. Both of her wings became badly entangled and she tried to chew herself off the wire. Someone spotted Flora the next morning and, although they thought she had already passed, they still called her in to us. Flora was in a bad state and was touch and go for a couple of days. Her injuries are very severe but she doesn’t let them get her down. Although she is half the size of the other bats in care with her she shows them whose boss! If your interested in copying Flora’s hair care routine her secret is banana smoothie.

Barbed wire is a serious threat for so many species. In many cases barbed wire is completely unnecessary or wildlife friendly fencing options could be used instead. Please help spread the word on the dangers of barbed wire so we can prevent more wildlife like Flora from becoming entangled.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬
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This sweetheart is Shelley, a young black flying fox girl. She flew into something and ended up on the ground with a sore shoulder. She managed to climb a nearby footpath shrub and hung there low to the ground, too sore to move further. Shelley was very lucky that this was near some roadworks because next morning when a lovely traffic controller arrived for work, she saw Shelley, and called us to come and help her. Thank you 💕
Shelley was very cold and responded well to a lovely rest in a warm ICU and some TLC. She’s now continuing her recovery in a flight aviary with other flying foxes and should be ready for release soon.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This delightful broad nosed bat is Chicken Nugget. He was found trapped in a bucket of water after falling in and getting stuck. It has been very chilly the past couple of weeks so poor Chicken Nugget was absolutely freezing with a high risk of aspiration pneumonia! Chicken Nugget has spent over a week in our care thoroughly enjoying our buffet and toasty warm bed. Sometimes it can take our microbats awhile to get used to being tweezer fed meal worms. This is because they usually catch insects in flight so are not used to eating while stationary. To his carers relief, Chicken Nugget had no such issues and was immediately feeding like a pro. He has now been cleared with a clean bill of health and was released back to his home over the weekend. Safe travels Chicken Nugget 🦇

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬
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We’re not sure how Roger, an adult black flying fox, came to be on the ground in a suburban back yard. He may have flown into a glass pool fence after getting a drink. A curious labrador heard the kerfuffle and came to check him out. Luckily the dog didn’t hurt him, and the wonderful caring homeowner quickly came and brought the pooch inside then gave us a call. Meanwhile, a very scared Roger managed to crawl away to the back of the yard and that’s where our rescuer found him, still terrified from his encounter with a large dog but unharmed.

Once with our rehabber he gradually calmed down with the help of a warm, dark, quiet bed and as much banana as he’d eat.

Roger has a graze on his left wrist and the base of his left thumb, which likely happened when he flew into the glass. He’s enjoying some R&R with some of our other rehabbing flying foxes and will be released as soon as his grazes have healed.

Thank you so much to this lovely family. 💕

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This beautiful Grey-headed flying fox is Big Foot. He was found caught by his toe on the hooks of a fishing lure which had been left entangled in a tree overhanging a river. Big Foot would have been getting a drink by belly dipping. Belly dipping is when a bat flies low over water and dips their chest and belly into the water. Bats will do this over rivers or streams and sometimes even back yard pools. When the bat lands they then lick the water off their bellies. Big Foot was on his way back to the colony when he belly dipped. Big foot didn’t see the lure as he flew up and became caught by his foot. Thankfully, a kind person on their early morning walk identified that Big Foot was in big trouble and called us. Big Foot was brought into care and made a full recovery before being released back to his colony.
Fishing line is by far the most dangerous kind of debris encountered by wildlife. Not only does it entangle turtles and fish but also kills birds, bats and other small mammals. We realise that when fishing line stuck in a tree, it may be difficult to reach but leaving it there is a cruel hazard to all wildlife. If you are able to, please retrieve all snagged lines and fishing gear when you fish, whether yours or others, and dispose of it properly.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬
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This weeks membership feature 🦇

Who are you and what do you within the organisation?
My name is Lauren, and I am a bat rescuer. I also love to help in other ways, such as monitoring my local flying fox colony and participating in the barbed wire mitigation program.

What do you love about bats and volunteering with BCRQ?
Bats are very interesting animals. Flying foxes in particular, are a keystone species, meaning that other animals and plants rely on them for survival. They're really important for our forests! They're very social animals and extremely intelligent. Volunteering has been such a meaningful and enriching experience for me, and I've had the best mentors and support network.

How does your volunteering fit in with work/family?
I work full time and have 2 children, so I rescue after hours and on weekends. It's busier during certain times of the year, and quieter during others.

Any advice for people thinking of joining?
I was initially nervous that I wouldn't know how to handle a bat during a rescue, but I paired up with an experienced rescuer on quite a few rescues, and this grew my confidence and I'm now keen to mentor others in the future. Bats need people! If you're interested in helping them, you can always just call us to find out more.

Interested in joining? Please follow the link below
bats.org.au/get-involved/join-now/
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We have had a number of inappropriate fruit tree netting rescues as a result of the heavy rain. Rain washes the nectar from flowers leading to short periods of scarce food. Beautiful Sage here was feeling hungry and discovered a tree ripe with mandarins. Sadly when she landed she became entangled in the netting. She did manage to chew herself free but has done some serious damage to her wing in the process. With so much winter rain we are expecting our native trees to continue flowering and providing important nectar for our bats. There are currently Eucalypts in bud so flowers (and nectar) are not far away! Sage is healing well but will need to spend many weeks in care recovering. Please remember that any netting you can poke a finger through is not safe for wildlife!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬
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