ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

This is Rafa the Little Red Flying-fox, named after Rafa Nadal (before he lost at the Australian Open tennis). We think he ingested some sort of toxin, likely from some pond water he drank. Watery eyes is one symptom and you can still see traces of that in the first photo, although it’s much better than it was. By day 8, he was feeling well enough to be out of bed and to hang for a couple of hours. He has a way to go to regain his strength but, unlike his namesake, batty Rafa is going to be a winner. 🦇😍

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This is Tikka, a male little red flying fox. Our rescuers recently had a mission of a rescue to find Tikka located somewhere within a local horse racing track. A vague location was communicated to us to so it took seven rescuers some time and a few laps around the racetrack to finally locate Tikka high in a tree. A flying fox by itself in a tree is not normal so our rescuers use a long extendable pole to retrieve Tikka and get him the help he needed. Tikka had some fresh holes in his wings and with an abundance of barbed wire in the area; we suspect Tikka has been caught on the barbs and managed to free himself or has had someone free him. Tikka was dehydrated, exhausted and injured so has been brought into our care for treatment as his prospects without care were grim. Thankfully the injuries to his wings will heal well in care and we expect Tikka to make a full recovery.

We always stress the importance of never handling or touching bats yourself. Although it can be confronting to see a bat entangled on barbed wire, it is very important that you call your closest wildlife rescue or us immediately to assist. Although flying fox wings heal remarkably well, they cannot heal everything. So our rescuers are trained to gently unwind and untangle membrane. A small sliver of viable membrane can be the difference between life and death for our bats so please leave this to the professionals. All bats rescued off barbed wire need to immediately come into care.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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This lovely young man is Raziel, a sub-adult male black flying fox. Young Raziel was found on the ground by a homeowner who gave us a call once he was discovered. One of our rescuers was sent out to retrieve him and bring him to one of our carers. Raziel was underweight and had some puncture wounds on his wings and body. We suspect Raziel may have been grabbed by a predator, potentially a cat or a predatory bird. Thankfully Raziel dodged major injury and we expect he will make a full recovery. Being underweight, Raziel has been treated to our delicious high protein mango smoothie. As you can see he thoroughly enjoys it! Raziel will soon be moving onto a flight aviary where he will do the last of his healing before being released back into the wild.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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This very handsome young man is Rhys, a male black flying fox. We think Rhys has ingested something poisonous and ended up on the ground in the backyard of the house next to his colony. Unfortunately, this home had a number of dogs that slept outside at night who proceeded to jump on him. Thankfully the homeowner heard the commotion and restrained her dogs before they could grab Rhys. This would have been a great time to call us as we operate 24/7 but the homeowner did not realise this and used a hose to spray Rhys until he climbed up a palm tree. The next morning Rhys was still up in the palm tree and, thinking he was dead, the homeowner called the council to collect him. Council arrived and after some poking realised Rhys was still alive and we were then called in the late afternoon. Rhys had managed to climb around 6m up a very small and spindly fruiting palm tree which made his rescue very difficult. The rescuer had to balance on the ladder and use an extendable net to try and retrieve Rhys from the canopy of the palm. Once retrieved the rescuer could see that Rhys had no major injuries but he seemed quite unwell. The rescuer was also able to have a chat to the homeowner about things they could do differently if this situation happened again in the future. Like Dina who we posted recently, Rhys appears to have ingested the same toxin or poison and become unwell. Dina and Rhys were rescued on the same day by the same rescuer and brought into her care for treatment. They have improved and progressed together for the past couple of weeks and are now inseparable.

Rhys has been sponsored in honour of a human Rhys. Flying fox Rhys has shown incredible resilience overcoming not just ingesting something poisonous, but getting out of a tricky situation with the dogs. This is a resilience that is mirrored in his human counterpart. We wish human Rhys all the best!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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This big boy is Beethoven, a black flying fox. Beethoven was discovered in a hole in a construction site that happened to be positioned below a mango tree. It’s the very start of our breeding season here for our black flying foxes so all of the eligible bachelors are trying their best to woo the receptive females. We suspect Beethoven may have become a little carried away and got into a tiff with another male. Unfortunately for Beethoven, his competitor was the winner and Beethoven has fallen from the tree and hit his head. Beethoven has sustained a suspected concussion so is a little out of it at the moment. But flying foxes heal very well from concussions so we expect Beethoven to be back out in the wild wooing the ladies in no time.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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This lovely old girl is Dina, a female black flying fox. Late one night some homeowners heard a big bang on their glass door. Not thinking much of it they investigated what had happened early the next morning. They found Dina hanging on their awning not looking too flash. They called us straight away and we sent one of our rescuers out. Unfortunately, by the time she arrived Dina had disappeared from her spot on the awning and was nowhere to be found. Hearing how the homeowners described Dina it was clear she was in great need of rescue so the rescuer started to search the large property. Around half an hour later the rescuer managed to spot Dina hanging in the low branches of a mango tree. Dina was very dehydrated and incredibly thin. It was clear that Dina had been unwell for some time and flying into the house had saved her life. We think Dina may have ingested something toxic or poisonous which has caused her to become very ill. Dina was touch and go for a few days as her carer tried to get her properly hydrated and start to put some weight onto her very emaciated form. Thankfully Dina has thrived in care and is piling on weight. She was very weak and on a strict smoothie diet for a couple of weeks but is now hanging and eating solid pieces of fruit. Dina will have a couple more weeks to regain her strength before going to a flight aviary to regain her flight fitness in preparation for release. Dina is pictured here with her bestie Rhys whose story we will also share shortly.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Although he closely resembles a house elf, this little one is in fact a baby large footed myotis. This is a very cool species of microbat as they use their oversized feet to skim the water, fishing for freshwater invertebrates. This little baby lives with his friends and family in the roof of a patio at a lovely families home. This little one has gone for an adventure and fallen from the roof and onto the ground. The family quickly spotted him and gave us a call to assist. Our rescuer assessed and rehydrated the baby before giving him the all clear to rejoin his colony. Although he is very small, weighing only a couple of grams, he has a large set of lungs and was calling loudly for his mum. The rescuer was able to use a ladder to access the colony and pop him back in with them. She heard some very excited chitters from both baby and adults as he climbed back up with his colony. Hopefully this little one saves the rest of his adventures for when he can fly in a few weeks time.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Usually we only post positive stories on our social media but Peter has a very important message for cat owners. Peter is a bentwing microbat, a critically important native species. Peter was out foraging for the night when he was captured and mauled by a pet cat, irresponsibly allowed to roam. This cat played with Peter and caused him terrible injuries. By the time Peter was found in the morning by a neighbour all our rescuer could do was have him humanely put to rest. Peter’s death was completely preventable. If you have a cat keep it inside or enclosed 24/7. Cats live perfectly happy and significantly healthier lives inside or enclosed. Also remember that cats are an invasive predator and our wildlife have not adapted to avoid them so are more susceptible to their predation. Cats are lovely pets but, if not kept responsibly, they are devastating for our wildlife. Please be a responsible pet owner and ensure your beloved pet does not cause the death of our precious native wildlife like Peter.

***Important note*** all wildlife a cat has interacted with need to see a vet immediately. Even if the animal appears uninjured, it likely has almost invisible puncture wounds which will become infected and cause a slow death. Call your local wildlife rescue immediately if you suspect your cat has interacted with an animal.

Here is a great article for those still on the fence on keeping your cat responsibly - theconversation.com/one-cat-one-year-110-native-animals-lock-up-your-pet-its-a-killing-machine-13...

We would love to see our followers responsibly kept pet cats and tips on how you keep them occupied and entertained inside!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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And they're off! The hatch on our crèche aviary is open and the first class of our crèche orphans are free to come and go as they please. The more confident orphans have already started their grand adventure into the wild while those more reserved will hang around the aviary for awhile longer. This style of release is called ‘soft release’ as these babies will still be support fed until they find their feet in the wild.

A big thank you to all of our symbolic adopters who sponsored bats this season! Feeding all of these orphans isn’t cheap so your support allows us to continue to rescue, raise and release these babies back into the wild where they belong.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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