ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

This young black flying fox is Scott. We’re not sure why he’d been in a backyard for a couple of days, but we’re very glad human Scott realized this wasn’t right and gave us a call. Batty Scott didn’t fly off as our rescuer climbed a ladder to catch him so something was up. Turns out he’s very partial to our famous banana smoothie. He’ll stay in care with us til he’s put on some weight and is flying well, then we’ll release him back to the wild to continue his important role of pollination and seed dispersal.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.
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This sweet little lady is Barb, an eastern broadnosed bat. Barb was found entangled on a barbed wire fence by a kind property owner. Being rural and with Barb so small, she was able to use thick gloves to gently untangle and remove her. This is something we strongly discourage with flying foxes but it was an exceptional scenario with little Barb. This lovely property owner gave us a call and met our rescuer half way to transfer Barb into our care. Barb had some X-rays taken at the rspca to ensure she had no broken bones and was given the all clear. She spent a couple of weeks in our care recovering from the membrane damage before being cleared for release. In the mean time, the property owner had removed the barbed wire to ensure Barbs home was safe for her. Little Barb has now been released back at her home to rejoin her colony!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This beautiful adult black flying fox girl is Alita and she was foraging one night when she mistook some reflections in glass for open space and bumped into it. She then found herself down some steps in a semi-enclosed space that she had no hope of escaping from. Thank you very much to the caring resident who called us. Alita has no major injuries and honestly, she’s quite miffed about her experience.

She quaffed down 50mL of blackcurrant juice and soon joined the other bats in the rehab aviary. Thankfully, we’re not expecting her stay with us to be for very long.

Alita is named in appreciation of one of our generous donors. ❤ Thank you, Alita!

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This gorgeous girl is Danika, a sub adult black flying fox. Danika was out foraging for the night when she flew into a sliding glass door that she thought was open space. Danika hit her head very hard, giving herself a severe concussion. The homeowners found her half heartedly hanging on their deck the next morning and gave us a call to rescue her. We took Danika for a check up at the rspca to make sure she hadn’t broken any bones with how hard she hit the door. Thankfully she had no breaks, just the mother of all headaches that we managed with pain relief. It took Danika weeks to completely recover from her head trauma and it will now take her weeks longer to recover the flight fitness she’s lost. Hopefully we will have this girl fit and ready to return to the wild soon 🦇

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
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Flying foxes are sun lovers. Here are some of our in-care bats enjoying the sun, stretching, scratching and grooming.

We had a horrendous summer season, with hundreds of extra orphans from The Palms National Park. With over 300 hand raised babies having been creched and released at our release facility from January to April, we are coming up for air and our bats in care are now down to manageable numbers.

Amongst the bats you see here are some late-season orphans and some barbed wire victims.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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We have some good news to share in regards to the legal shooting of flying foxes in our state of Queensland. Yesterday it was announced that shooting will be completely banned in 3 years with an immediate reduction of 80-90% of the number allowed to be shot. We knew that an immediate ban was highly unlikely so this announcement is better then we expected. We want to thank all of our amazing followers for making submissions against the shooting of our flying foxes. We attended a consultation meeting where the department actually commented on the sheer number of pro flying fox submissions they received! So thank you for speaking up for our intelligent pollinators and helping to make this result possible.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This sweet girl is Cass, an adult black flying fox. Cass is another victim of paralysis syndrome, found weak and skinny. Paralysis syndrome is a toxicity of unknown origin, with work to figure out the cause ongoing. Paralysis syndrome causes paralysis of bodily functions including blinking, swallowing and in the later stages, breathing. We have had good success treating mild to moderately affected bats with fluids and supportive care. Sweet Cass has recovered wonderfully under her rehabilitators care and is now doing the last of her recovery in a flight aviary. It can take a few months for paralysis bats to fully regain their strength but Cass will get back out in to the wild as soon as she’s ready.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬‬
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What have flying foxes got to do with koalas?
Everything!
Flying foxes pollinate the eucalypts that koalas must have to survive. Flying foxes are bees of the night. And because they travel long distances, flying foxes ensure genetic diversity of forest tree species, keeping our native forests healthy for all the wildlife that depend on them.
Last Sunday several of our committed volunteers attended the Old Petrie Town Wild Koala Day to help spread this important message of the critical importance of flying foxes to koalas and our environment.
Our sweet little “am-bat-ador” was a great drawcard. Many people said they’d never seen a flying fox up close and were amazed how cute they are. ❤

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This sweet young man is Terzini. He was feeding in a tree near a barbed wire fence and he didn’t see the fence as he flew off and sadly became entangled. Luckily he was spotted by some nearby workmen next morning and called in to us. It was a commercial site and our rescuers were escorted to where Terzini was by a caring staff member.

He has a sore mouth and wing where he was caught but he is recovering nicely.

Terzini is named in appreciation of one of our generous donors. <3 Thank you!

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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