ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

On today’s episode of baby bats try new fruit we have Salsa and Nachos trying a piece of pawpaw. Like mango, pawpaw is a firm favourite with all of our flying foxes. Pawpaw trees are both easy and very fast to grow so are a great addition to a suburban backyard! You can also pick the pawpaw you want to keep for yourself before they ripen and leave the remainder for wildlife to enjoy. Sharing our backyard resources with wildlife is critically important for their survival. Humans like to live in fertile areas so as we continue to clear vegetation, we are removing the highest quality foraging habitat for many species. Wildlife now rely on our backyards so please ensure your backyard is safe for wildlife and, where possible, plant native flowering or fruit trees for our wildlife to share. Salsa, Nachos and all of their friends and family would certainly appreciate it!

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Unfortunately, it's not just marine species impacted by discarded fishing gear, our flying foxes are also susceptible. Flying foxes drink by flying down and dipping their belly in the water which leaves them vulnerable to becoming entangled in fishing line and hooks irresponsibly left in our waterways. This baby flying fox became horribly entangled on some fishing line that was hanging off a tree over the river. She was suspended above the river by her foot and wing, completely helpless. Thankfully someone spotted her and called us straight away. We sent out two of our rescuers who had a kayak as she could not be reached from the river bank. One rescuer had a knife on an extendable pole while the other had a net to catch her. After a couple of attempts they were able to cut the line and catcher her in the net. Bringing her back to shore, the fishing line constricting her wing and foot was cut and she was given some tasty glucose to treat shock. This little girl should still be with her mum so we aren't sure what she was doing flying over the river. The injuries to her wing and foot are severe but we will give her the best chance she possibly has to heal and be released back into the wild.

If you fish, please do not discard any of your fishing gear. Even small amounts of fishing line can be fatal for a large number of species. If you are out and about please collect any discarded fishing gear you do see as you may just save a life.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Ever thought of becoming a bat rescuer?!?!

If so BCRQ is running an induction and rescue training on the 24th of January for new members.

We are currently seeking new members who live in Brisbane and surrounding districts, Logan, Toowoomba or the Lockyer Valley that would love to get involved and help Australia’s bats.

For more information or to join visit bats.org.au – Get Involved.

Pictured is one of our Rockhampton babies who is still in need of symbolic adoption. Symbolic adoption is a one time donation of $90AUD which helps us to pay for their costs while in care. Please PM us if you would like to adopt this little boy.
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In pre-creche, some of our hand-raised orphans form friendships with other orphans and in these cases we ensure they go to the same creche session. Sometimes orphans raised together carry their friendships through. So it is with Audrey and Evie, shown here snuggled up to each other. These two sweet girls were raised by the same carer and have continued their close friendship in pre-creche.
Audrey (with the broader face) and Evie were adopted by one of our wonderful supporters and named after her gorgeous granddaughters. Thank you, Beryl ❤️ and hi to human Audrey and Evie. 👋

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This handsome man is Luca, a male black flying fox. He was hit by a car while out foraging at night. Thankfully the person who accidentally hit him did the right thing and stopped, located where he was, didn’t touch him and gave us a call straight away. They were even lovely enough to stay with Luca so we could easily locate him when we got there! Luca was extremely distressed by his experience but quickly calmed down once he realised we had banana smoothie for him. He’s come off very lightly, all things considered, with injuries that will heal well in care.

Sometimes it’s completely unavoidable when you hit an animal but it’s what you do afterwards that counts. Too many animals are hit and left to die. Do the right thing and take responsibility for the animal you have injured and get it the help it deserves.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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Our good friends up in Rockhampton are in great need of some help. They are a completely self funded small team facing drought, heat, mass ‘abandonment’ events, misinformed public in addition to the usual rescues. They operate over a very large area, with hours of driving to rescue a single bat. To top it off they are required to pay for all of the veterinary costs for their bats. This year has been particularly difficult with the mass ‘abandonment’ events up in Rockhampton. We were able to help out by transporting multiple loads of these babies back to Brisbane to lessen their load but the situation is ongoing.

We are asking all of our lovely followers who have supported us so brilliantly to please consider making a small donation to our friends in Rockhampton. You know your money will go straight back into buying critical supplies and paying off vet bills for central Queensland’s bats. One of our carers has set up a gofund me donation page so please use this if you are able to donate.

In the video is Nettle, a baby flying fox rescued by our friends in Rockhampton and transported down to us for care. He was critically thin but is quickly putting on weight and loving his special smoothie mix.

www.gofundme.com/f/rockhampton-bat-rescue?qid=dae737d7a5683df2f112bda508fa3b97
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Welcome to today’s episode of baby bats try new fruit. Today we have Salsa and Nachos trying a piece of banana. A lot of people wonder why flying foxes have such large and sharp looking teeth if they eat fruit and nectar. The answer is that these teeth are designed so the flying foxes can grab a piece of fruit and fly away to eat it. The long teeth act like skewers, helping to prevent them from dropping it as they fly. From around 6 weeks of age the babies lose their milk teeth and these larger adult teeth grow through.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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*Important COVID update*

As we head into another (hopefully shorter) lockdown we would like to remind everyone that wildlife rescue is an essential service and is not restricted. So please do not hesitate to call us if you find a bat alone during the day. Our phone volunteers can arrange for contact free rescues to ensure all social distancing requirements are met and everyone stays safe.

Pictured are Taco and Nachos flaunting social distancing requirements. These two baby flying foxes are from the same household though so are allowed to cuddle to their hearts content.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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This big eyed beauty is Tandoori, a female little red flying fox. She was rescued off barbed wire from a rural property by our friends at Bat Care Capricornia. She was transported down to us for treatment so she can stay with our other little reds in care. She is one of the lucky ones, only caught by one barb and called in early by a caring person. Unfortunately countless animals are not as lucky as Tandoori and are left to suffer and die on these fences. If you are driving in rural or urban areas, please keep an eye out for animals caught on barbed wire. Don’t assume someone else will stop and call them in because they likely will not. Tandoori has some damage to her wing that will heal well in our care. She will be released back into the wild once her wing has fully healed.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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Last week one of our rescuers made the long trip up to Rockhampton and back to Brisbane to pick up some new rescues. Our friends In Rockhampton are having ongoing issues and are at capacity with orphans and rehab flying foxes. We agreed to transport 6 orphans and 2 adult little reds to our carers to help ease their load. The orphans seem to be linked to the ‘abandonment’ event that is ongoing in Rockhampton. These babies are being left in the camps by their Mums who are then not able to return to them. After a few days these babies grow weak enough that they fall from the trees and are able to be rescued. We are thrilled to report that the 6 extremely skinny babies are thriving and putting on weight. They are being fed a special high fat and protein smoothie mix which they are thoroughly enjoying. The two little reds were barbed wire rescues and both are expected to make a full recovery.

A massive thank you to those who donated to pay for fuel on our last trip and increased our capacity to undertake this transport.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions.
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