ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

It has been microbat madness on the rescue phone recently! It’s birthing season for microbats as well as flying-foxes and we are receiving many calls to rescue tiny little microbat pups. They’re almost always close to their roost. If newborn or not yet fully furred, they’ve likely fallen out of the roost, or if a little older, they might have had a glide or misadventurous first flight. Unlike flying-foxes, it’s far easier to reunite microbats with their mothers by either putting them directly back into the roost or by placing the pup in a box on a ladder after dark for mum to fly down and pick up. A homeowner found three tiny microbat pups on her back stairs one morning. Knowing they needed help, she gave us a call to assist. She was able to put an ice cream container over the pups to keep them safe and secure until we arrived. These pups were in great condition and have only fallen out of the roost that night. Our rescuer gave them all fluids and started the search for their roost. After a few minutes of searching she found the tell tale scats on the ground and got up on a ladder to have a look. Sure enough, she discovered a small crevice with a roost of microbats. She was able to directly return the microbats to the roost and construct a ‘baby catcher’ sling out of shade cloth to go below the roost. This means that as adventurous babies fall, they can simply climb back up in to the roost themselves. A perfect outcome for these tiny intrepid travelers.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This beautiful little girl is Brie, a baby grey headed flying fox. One of our dedicated rescuers was doing a sweep of a colony when they spotted Brie. She was cold and motionless, hanging just above the ground. The rescuer jumped into action, giving Brie glucose, getting her warm and administering fluids. Brie was extremely dehydrated and emaciated but the stabilisation by this rescuer had her starting to brighten up. Very shortly after Brie was rescued, the area was hit by a number of severe storms which caused flooding and wind damage. We are so thankful for the dedication of our amazing rescuer to check this colony in time to save little Brie. She is now in the care of one of our rehabilitators, drinking small but frequent bottles for her emaciated belly to adjust. We suspect something has happened to Bries mum and she has not been able to return to Brie in the colony. At only 6 weeks old Brie is too young to fly so quickly started deteriorating. Thankfully we got to her in time and Brie will be raised in our care before being soft released when she’s older.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This sweetie is Kim. Kim is around six to seven weeks old, so her mum would leave her behind in a creche tree beside her camp while she went out foraging at night. Kim’s mum knew she was safe there with other older babies, who were also too big now to cling on to their mothers while they flew.
Sadly, something happened to Kim’s mum and she was unable to return. Baby Kim called and called for her mother until human Kim heard her and realised this wasn’t right.

She was about 6m high in a thick mangrove out over water so access was from a bridge. Our rescuers used a pole taped to another pole with a net on the end which reached Kim, but she was scared and didn’t know we were there to help so she moved away.
After many attempts, we called in the Fire Service. They had no suitable equipment given the awkward situation. However one of the young firefighters, with a determination matched by ours, used our pole for one last try and he managed to catch Kim in the net and bring her down. Thank you, Daniel. ❤️

Thankfully Kim can now be raised as an orphan and released back to the wild when she’s ready.

Kim has not yet been adopted. We’d be very grateful if a lovely follower would consider symbolically adopting her. We request a donation of $95 AUD which is tax deductible in Australia. Please comment if you’d like to adopt little Kim.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This handsome boy is Shine, a baby black flying fox. Shine was spotted outside Shine health services by one of their staff. He was hanging off a drain pipe by himself looking quite miserable. Thankfully they knew something was wrong and gave us a call. We aren’t quite sure why Shine was by himself and what happened to his mum. We suspect she may have been electrocuted on overhead powerlines but we can’t say for sure. Shine was extremely scared and distressed when he first came into care but has now settled in. He is 7 weeks old so will spend a few more weeks with his carer before moving to crèche to be soft released.

A big thank you to Shine health services for not only spotting and calling in Shine, but for their extremely generous donation and sponsorship of Shine.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This dignified older lady is Mina, a black flying fox. Mina parked her baby somewhere safe before heading off to forage for the night. She flew in to feed on a tasty palm when her wing became badly entangled in a barbed wire fence. She struggled and struggled to free herself but just made the damage worse. Thankfully the business was open 24 hours and a worker spotted her and called us in. At 3am our rescuer was woken up to rescue Mina in the pouring rain. She managed to remove the barbs from Minas wing and get her off the fence. Heartbreakingly the rescuer could see that Mina was lactating but her baby was not with her. Mina spent a couple of weeks having her wing tended to before heading to the flight aviary to do the last of her healing. We were not able to save Minas baby but Mina herself will be released to have more babies in her future.

Our bats are all unique individuals and some take longer to adjust to care than others. Mina needed lots of mango smoothie to convince her that we meant her no harm.

A big thank you to Cortney for her generous sponsorship of Mina.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This sweet girl is Stormy, a baby black flying fox. Stormy was spotted by a member of the public by herself, trying to climb a tree. Thankfully the member of the public could see she was in trouble and gave us a call to assist. We aren’t sure what has happened to Stormy’s Mum but she has been named for the severe storms that led up to her rescue. Little Stormy was not in a good way when rescued, emaciated and with a badly broken thumb. Our senior trauma carer was able to get her stable but her thumb needed veterinary intervention. One of the generous vets we work with was able to pin Stormy’s thumb which is now healing up well. Stormy needed to wear a little dress to immobilise her sore thumb and prevent her from messing with it. Stormy will stay in our care until she is old enough to be soft released.

A big thank you to Christina, the member of the public who spotted Stormy, called in her rescue and who took the photo of her on the tree.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This budding mechanic is Battholomew, a baby black flying fox. Battholomew was heard calling for his mum around a truck mechanic during the day. Not knowing what he was and not thinking too much of it, the mechanics did not investigate the noise. The next day Battholomew would no longer be ignored and climbed under the truck the mechanics were working on. Thankfully they called us in to rescue him. Little Battholomew was less than 3 weeks old and absolutely filthy from being under the truck. He was very hungry, dehydrated and continued to call for his mum. We don’t know what happened to his mum but it was clear he had fallen from height or sustained some kind of impact. After a couple of days of warm bottles and cuddles with his carer, Battholomew settled and is now a happy and healthy baby. His injuries have healed up and he will be raised in our care until he is old enough to be soft released back out into the wild where he belongs.

A big thank you to Lily for symbolically adopting Battholomew for her dear friend Natisse.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Just a friendly reminder that bat taxidermy and skeletons are not ethical. Sadly we have seen a significant rise in bat taxidermy and skeletons as people become more interested in bats. Well meaning people purchase these unethical products as gifts or decorations. Sellers blatantly lie or are misled themselves, claiming they are ethically produced. Usually they say the bats are either found already passed or that the bats are bred in captivity to be used for taxidermy. Both of these scenarios are an impossibility for bats due to their biology. Occasionally you may find a relatively intact bat that has already passed but to find these fresh, completely intact and in large numbers is impossible. Breeding bats in captivity is extremely difficult, has high financial costs and requires specialist enclosures that do not exist where these bats are coming from. One of the most commonly seen bats in taxidermy is the beautifully coloured painted Woolly bat. This species is now listed as near threatened on the IUCN red list and this is a direct quote from the assessment ‘The decline is expected to continue due to a continuing rise in hunting that stems from increased demand of taxidermy ornaments worldwide.’

Please do not contribute to the unethical poaching of bats. And please, spread the word so other bat lovers don’t unknowingly buy these horrific products. If you want an option for an ethical bat gift, why not consider one of our orphan symbolic adoptions 🦇

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Dear Brisbane friends,
Here's a wonderful opportunity to meet some of our orphans, see wild bats flying out at dusk, and learn more about how important bats are to the environment. 🦇💕
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Have you considered adopting an orphan as a gift? We are delighted to invite symbolic adoption for these five dear little orphaned baby flying-foxes.

UPDATE: Thank you for your generosity. These babies have been adopted. Sadly we have more babies being rescued most days. If you would like to adopt an orphan, please feel free to message this page and let us know if you prefer a boy or a girl. Thank you. 🦇

We request a donation of $95 AUD which covers milk formula, teats and dummies, vet supplies, and later, fruit and High Protein Supplement.
We are more than happy to prepare your electronic adoption certificate in the name of someone you’d like to give a gift to. We will then email it to you to pass on, or email it direct to them. Just let us know. Or, of course, adopt for yourself!

As well as a certificate, you’ll receive another photo and we’ll tell you the story of how your baby came into our care. And we’d love you to give your orphan a name.

To symbolically adopt your orphan, please type ‘adopted’ in the comment box of the picture of the orphan you wish to adopt and we’ll be in touch.

In Australia, this donation is tax deductible. Thank you most sincerely.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook