ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

We have just surpassed an exciting milestone in our barbed wire mitigation project, 20,000 tags installed! Barbed wire is one of our most common reasons for rescue and in most cases, is fatal. Over the past couple of winters we have been installing aluminium tags on barbed wire fences where we have rescued multiple bats. These tags work by allowing bats to see and avoid fences while flying at night. This winter, we were honoured to be approved for a grant through Ipswich city council to focus on locations within Ipswich. To date we have not rescued a bat off one of our tagged fences but we will continue to monitor their effectiveness over the coming seasons and make changes where needed.

A big thank you to Ipswich City Council for our grant funding and to all of our amazing volunteers doing the hard yards installing these tags.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬
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From juice in bed to hanging full time! This charming boy is Ash, the juvenile black flying fox. Ash was discovered on the ground in a pretty sorry state. We suspect Ash was clipped by a car as he had a serious concussion and a sore back. We’re very thankful that a kind member of the public spotted Ash and called us in to help him. Ash has had a long recovery from his injuries. Although not broken, his back has been sore and he has needed lots of bed rest to help him heal. His concussion also caused him to be quite confused, refusing fruit and only accepting juice. Ash has now recovered enough that he is hanging full time smashing our free fruit buffet! He still has a few more weeks of healing until he is 100% but we are very proud of his progress.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬
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This sweet little man is Goliath the lesser long eared bat. Goliath thought he had scored himself an easy meal when he spotted some insects sitting on a wall. He flew over to grab them and was immediately stuck in a sticky glue trap. Goliath struggled and struggled but he only became more trapped in the glue. Here Goliath stayed until he was spotted some time later by the homeowner. Thankfully they gave us a call to rescue Goliath and he, still firmly attached to the glue trap, was immediately rushed to the rspca to be sedated and removed. Poor Goliath was very skinny and dehydrated but he had been stuck in a way preventing him from chewing and ingesting the glue, which has saved his life. Goliath has been in our care recovering the past couple of weeks and we are so pleased to report he has been successfully released.

So many native animals become stuck on these awful glue traps and die horrific deaths. Please do not use these traps and especially do not put them outside where anything could become trapped! Goliath was lucky but so many birds, lizards and bats are not.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬
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Young Sebbie is incredibly lucky to be alive. She was found in the grounds of a school when the lid on one of the bins was lifted. We were told she could have been in there for three days!
She may have gone in seeking fruit scraps and somehow the lid closed on her. Luckily there were enough fruit scraps to keep her alive til the lid was lifted. Someone tilted the bin and out she crawled. She was given a banana which she promptly quaffed nearly all of. She has a cut between two of her toes and her ear tips are sore but has come off otherwise unscathed. Amazing!
She spent her first night in care in an ICU, then in a hospital enclosure in a heated room and on day 3 she joined the other rehabbing bats in a flight aviary. Sebbie is the one with light blue collar. It’s very normal for the bats already in the aviary to come and check out the new kid. 🦇

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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Sweet little Zara is a young black flying fox girl who didn’t see a glass pool fence at night and flew into it. Flying foxes instinctively know they aren’t safe on the ground and will always climb something and hang from it if they can. For Zara, that was a tiled wall. Luckily she was spotted by another young girl called Zara, whose home it was. Very caring and keen to help, human Zara bundled up batty Zara and kept her safe while her mum gave us a call. Human Zara didn’t touch batty Zara but she now understands even picking her up in the thick towel was inadvisable. Next time she’ll know not to touch and to let trained and vaccinated rescuers do the handling.
Batty Zara has one sore eye but is otherwise uninjured. After a short time in intensive care with all the blackcurrant juice she wished for, she joined our other rehabbing flying foxes and will be released when her eye is recovered, she’s a healthy weight and when conditions improve. (Please see our post from Sun 31 July to learn of the food shortage we’re currently experiencing.)

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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Gidget the Gould's wattled bat was found having a snooze on the wall of someones lounge room today. The owner thought it was a spider and said she was just about ready to burn the house down! Lucky she didn’t because it was just this cutie! Gidget is loving the fast food options she has here in rehab but she won’t have time to get too comfortable. She'll be released soon to fly free and munch away on insects, performing her important role of our natural pest control.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬

#bcrq #flyingfox #brisbane #queensland #notouchnorisk #fruitbat #bat #australia #wild #wildlife
#wildliferescue #keystone #microbat #australianwildlife
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To our lovely Brisbane followers,
Food is in short supply for our flying foxes right now. We believe the wet weather and cold nights has led to our native trees failing to flower. Younger bats are staying near a food source in the day time like this little one pictured.
In good times we don’t recommend feeding wild animals however we are at the point that putting fruit out for flying foxes would be helpful.
There are some very important conditions:
• Your feeding station must not be near power lines.
• It must not be near a road, especially a busy one.
• It must not be near a timber paling fence. (Bats can get stuck.)
• Do not put out food if cats roam in the area at night.
• Your feeding station must be at least 2m off the ground, preferably higher, and well out of reach of children and dogs.
• Keep your dog(s), if you have them, inside at night if you put food out for wildlife.
• Cut fruit into large bite-size pieces, as in the picture. A large bat may claim your feeding station as his or her own. Chunk-sized pieces will enable juvenile bats to sneak in and grab a piece and fly off with it to eat elsewhere.
• Be aware that fruit will be dropped so please clean this up so as not to encourage bats to come to the ground. Possums may clean it up for you!
• Suitable fruit is apples, pears, banana, any melon, or papaw.
• Small buckets with handles can be hung from a branch, eg buckets that yoghurt or hummus dip comes in. A carabiner can make this easier as pictured.
• Your local flying foxes may take some days to find your feeding station. Please be patient. Adding some ripe banana may help them find it with its strong aroma. Possums will find it too.
Thank you for helping if you’re able to do so safely – for both you and the bats.

As always, never touch a bat. No touch, no risk. If you see a bat on its own in the day time give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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Meet Hannah! Hannah is a juvenile Black flying fox who found herself caught on a barbed wire fence. Hannah was enjoying some figs on the tree hanging above the fence and as she took off her wing hooked and tangled on a barb. Unfortunately, this has caused damage to her wing membrane. In many cases bats wings can repair themselves if the bat is given a nutritious diet and time to heal. Hannah is currently in care getting the care and time she needs to recover and hopefully she will return to the skies soon!

Many native species fall victim to barbed wire fences. When animals become entangled on
the barbs they often sustain a serious injury. We have been working hard to promote wildlife
friendly fencing. In areas with numerous incidents we are approaching businesses for
permission to tag the fence to make it more visible. Ideally, we would like to see a shift away
from barbed wire completely.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬

bcrq #flyingfox #brisbane #queensland #notouchnorisk #fruitbat #bat #australia #wild #wildlife
#wildliferescue #keystone #microbat #australianwildlife
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This beautiful little girl is Willow the black flying fox. A lovely council worker spotted Willow on the ground in a park early one morning. Although not something we recommend, he scooped a very flat Willow up in his thick jacket and gave us a call. Poor Willow was in a sorry state and had hurt her back causing her legs not to work properly. We aren’t quite sure what caused this injury, maybe she was clipped by a car or fell while scuffling with a larger bat. Thankfully Willow has continued to improve in care but it will be many weeks until she is fully healed. She has also shown herself to be quite a grot so her carer has to give her a bath every day! Flying foxes are very clean animals but Willow is only a juvenile and not feeling too flash so she needs extra help. Luckily Willow is an absolute sweetheart and a real pleasure to care for. A big shout out to the kind council worker for getting Willow the help she so desperately needed.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬‬
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Oops. Little Tully found herself all tangled up while trying to snack on some yummy fruits last night. Unfortunately, she did not see the net and soon found herself all caught up. Thankfully she was found early in the morning and rescuers were able to cut her down and untangle her wings. While she does have some injuries from where the net cut into her wings she was found just in time and she is set to make a full recovery!

Fruit netting continues to cause harm to our native wildlife. Possums, birds and snakes can also fall victim to inappropriate fruit netting which causes the animals to become entangled and potentially lead to severe injuries. If you do not fancy sharing your backyard fruit with the local native wildlife please consider wildlife friendly netting. Wildlife friendly netting should have a mesh size of less than 5 mm. Ideally you want to choose a netting that you cannot poke your finger through. It important to check netting daily to ensure no animals are entangled or caught inside the netting.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬

#bcrq #flyingfox #brisbane #queensland #notouchnorisk #fruitbat #bat #australia #wild #wildlife
#wildliferescue #keystone #microbat #australianwildlife
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