ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

Djuk-koo (pronounced goo-goo) is a late season orphan. She was found in a small rural town north-west of Brisbane hanging on a clothes line. She was around 8 weeks old. It was not too far from a camp so we think her mum left her in the camp while she went out to forage, which is normal for a baby of Djuk-koo’s age, but something unfortunate happened to her mum that she couldn’t come back to Djuk-koo. After a day or so, poor Djuk-koo was left with no choice but to head out on her own to try and find food. Being so young and only just able to fly, she didn’t get very far. The lovely caller covered the clothesline to protect the baby from rain and was sitting under there with her when our rescuer arrived. He’s indigenous and rang his grandmother to ask about a name for her. Her name means flying-fox in Gurgurri language.

Djuk-koo is available to be symbolically adopted. We request a donation of AUD$90 and you'll receive a pdf adoption certificate and our sincere thanks. Please comment "adopted" if you'd like to adopt her and we'll be in touch.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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This pretty little girl is Max, a juvenile black flying fox. Max was found hanging low in a tree by herself. Bats by themselves during the day are usually in need of help so this member of the public did the right thing in giving us a call. Little Max is underweight and was very weak. She appears to be uninjured, she just hasn’t been coping well. As a juvenile this is a very difficult time for our young bats as they start to explore the world. Their mums continue to nurse them for up to 6 months as they learn to forage for themselves. Something may have happened to Max’s mum or Max may have just become lost. Whatever the reason we will ensure Max is a healthy weight before being soft released into the wild with our hand raised orphans.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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This is Aristoclea, a female black flying fox. This girl's rescue certainly had unique challenges! Her rescue scenario is one we see all too often, she had become entangled in inappropriate netting draped over a fruit tree. The unique part of this rescue was that the tree was next to multiple European bee hives! We sent out one of our rescuers who happens to also keep bees and had her own protective gear. The air was full of bees so a full bee suit was a necessity to safely rescue Aristoclea. Thankfully this girl wasn’t tightly entangled and we expect her to make a full recovery. Many bats are not as lucky so it’s important to remember that any netting you can poke a finger through is not safe for wildlife. The netting has been removed from this tree and replaced with a tight weave wildlife friendly option to keep our local wildlife safe.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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This very handsome boy had an impromptu pool party after he belly dipped in a pool and crash landed into a glass pool fence. Unlike microbats, flying foxes navigate by sight. A glass pool fence at night is almost invisible so we commonly rescue flying foxes who have gone in for a drink and flown into a fence. This boy had a sleep over in the pool area before being found in a sorry state in the morning. He has a concussion from hitting his head and is feeling quite sore. Thankfully we expect this boy will make a full recovery with some TLC and will be back out in the wild in no time. If you have a glass pool fence you can stop animals from flying into it by sticking decals on the glass or by hanging objects from the top.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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This is Peggy, a baby female black flying fox. Peggy’s rescue story is a common one at this time of year. Peggy was found on the ground, not too far from a colony. We suspect that something has happened to her mum and, in her desperation, Peggy has tried to leave the colony. Peggy was underweight and too young to be away from her mum. Peggy has come into our care so we can get her to a healthy weight and soft release her. Soft release is where the aviary is opened but the juveniles are still support fed as they find their feet. This method of release allows our bats some leeway as they learn to navigate and forage.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬
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Toby was attracted to some small trees in a roof garden on a low-rise building and accidentally flew down into the internal atrium of the building and couldn’t find his way out. Luckily for Toby, a subadult black flying-fox, the building manager gave us a call and he is now safely in care. He has a scrape beside his right eye and on some of his finger joints from scrambling around but nothing that won’t heal up nicely. The lovely Marki has also sponsored Toby. Thank you very much again!

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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“Hi, I’m Garry and I love banana. My cheeks are stuffed full of it.”
Garry found some lovely fig fruit on a backyard tree but didn’t see the netting over it and became entangled. The tree owner wanted to get help for Garry but doesn’t speak English very well, so called in his friend, Garry, to call us. Garry stayed and translated as our rescuer worked to free Garry the flying-fox, who luckily wasn’t tightly bound. Garry strongly encouraged the fruit tree owner to allow our rescuer to remove ALL the netting, not just what was needed to cut the bat out, and he agreed.
We are thrilled with this outcome. Our rescuer invited the translator to name the batty and since he’s a boy, he named him after himself.
Marki has sponsored his costs for the time he’s in care. Thank you Marki! 💕

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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To our Queensland friends,
We have a Scheme ID with Containers for Change so you can donate the refund on your recycled bottles, cans etc. to Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld.
If you’d like to do this, please open the Containers for Change app
then go to Scheme ID
then choose ADD+
then SEARCH
then type in Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
then ADD SCHEME ID.

Not all bottles are recyclable. 😁 Just ask Sherbet, who isn't planning on letting go of his.

Many thanks to anyone who chooses to support us in this way. 💕
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This little man is a juvenile black flying-fox who got hopelessly tangled up in this inappropriate netting on a papaw tree. He’s rubbed the skin off his nostrils trying to free himself and his mouth and lips are very sore from trying to bite himself free. He also has abrasions on his wing membrane.

This fine yet tough green netting can be deadly to all types of wildlife. You can protect your fruit without harming wildlife by individually bagging it or by using wildlife friendly netting which is called ‘hailguard’ or ‘crop protector’. This netting has a very fine weave that you can’t poke even the tip of your finger through. Luckily the lovely person who called us about this boy is aware of this now.

This sweet boy will remain in care for some weeks for all his injuries to heal, so we’d be very grateful if a generous follower would sponsor him to cover his care costs. We request a donation of AUD$90 and you'll receive a pdf sponsorship certificate and our sincere thanks. And we’d love you to name him!
Your donation is tax deductible in Australia.
Please comment "sponsored" if you'd like to sponsor him and we'll be in touch.
Update: this boy has been sponsored and his name is Strawberry. Thank you Libby. 💕🦇

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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Like Emerald in our previous post, Mameha is another juvenile black flying-fox girl. She was a little older at about four months old when rescued. A lovely person saw her on the ground under a huge bayside fig tree and called us. She could have got into a scuffle over the fig fruit with a larger bat and was knocked to the ground. Or she could have been bumped by a car. It’s impossible to know. But we do know she was very sore and dazed for the first few days. With loving nursing, she gradually improved and has now recovered to the point she can continue her rehab in a flight aviary til she’s ready for release.
We are so grateful to every person who finds a bat, doesn't touch, and calls us, because in many cases, they save a precious life. We are also very grateful to Tessa for sponsoring Mameha as a gift for her mum, Janet. Thank you! 💕

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
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