ABOUT BAT CONSERVATION AND RESCUE QLD

Bat Conservation and Rescue Qld
is a registered not-for-profit volunteer organization that strives to help people understand the importance
of all bat species, to provide a prompt and humane rescue service, to raise orphans and to rehabilitate injured bats before returning them to the wild.
BCRQ offers this free 24/7 community service all year round including public holidays.

We provide an efficient and humane service to rescue and rehabilitate injured and orphaned bats and return them to the wild as soon as possible.

We disseminate accurate information through literature, community events and talks to the general public about the importance of bats.

We are active advocates in the conservation of bats and their habitat.

We offer advice on helping to provide and improve habitats for bats as well as identifying botanical species that can be injurious to bats.

I HAVE FOUND A BAT

SEEK HELP – PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH BATS!

CALL OUR RESCUE HOTLINE ON 0488 228 134

If a bat bites or scratches a human, it may have to be destroyed and sent for testing for Australian Bat Lyssavirus – do not risk the bat’s life or your health. Only people trained and Rabies vaccinated should handle bats.

A flying-fox hanging on overhead power lines may still be alive. Even if dead, it may be a mother with a live baby tucked up under her wing. Please call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught on a barbed wire fence, please very carefully and without touching it, throw a towel over the bat to help keep it calm. Then call BCRQ immediately.

If you find a flying-fox caught in fruit tree netting, do not try and cut the bat out of the net but call BCRQ immediately.

If the bat is on the ground, please cover the bat with a cardboard box or a washing basket to contain it and call BCRQ immediately.

Any bat by itself through the day is in trouble.

Keep children and pets away from the bat to help minimise its stress and remember, NO TOUCH NO RISK!

HOW YOU CAN HELP

BECOME A MEMBER

Join as an active or associate member. BCRQ offers free training to members.

MAKE A DONATION

Donate via Bank Transfer or PayPal.

All donations of $2.00 and over are tax deductible.

Sign up for our newsletter


Facebook Posts

We are delighted that two more of our paralysis syndrome affected flying foxes have graduated to a flight aviary. Bowler and Reader, two lovely gentlemen, were rescued from an inner suburban park one day apart, one near the bowls club and one near the library. Both required intensive care for some weeks, then moved to a small aviary and finally a large flight aviary.
They’ll continue their recovery there with other recuperating toxin-affected bats and hopefully they’ll all get together and agree not to eat whatever made them sick ever again.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Sunday was a very busy and exciting day for us as it was our first day of crèche for the year. Crèche is the soft release program our hand raises orphans go through to set them up for success in the wild. Our orphans spend 2 weeks in our crèche flight aviary before the door is opened and they are free to come and go. They are then support fed for a number of weeks to give them time to find their feet and adapt to their natural diet. Our crèche site is near a flying fox colony so our orphans are able to easily find and assimilate with their wild counterparts. The first day of crèche is very busy as all bats are flight tested, weighed, measured and micro chipped before intake. The work continues as our amazing crèche volunteers cut fruit and clean the aviary every day for the next few weeks. All of this hard work is worth giving our babies their best chance of success in the wild.

Thank you to all of our symbolic adopters who have sponsored a baby this season. A large proportion of the sponsorship donation goes towards the crèche costs so we can continue to support feed for as long as they need to adjust.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This lovely girl is piper, a black flying fox. Piper thought she had hit the jackpot when she found a tree ripe with delicious figs. Unfortunately this tree was covered with inappropriate fruit netting that she became entangled in. Piper struggled and struggled but couldn’t free herself. The next morning the home owner spotted Piper and quickly called us in to help. Our rescuer raced out and quickly cut the netting to relieve the constriction. Piper is one of the lucky ones, suffering relatively minor injuries that will heal with time in care. The homeowner was appalled at what had happened to poor Piper and quickly removed the netting, sending us the photo of it in the bin where it belongs.

Any net that you can poke a finger through is not safe for wildlife. Wildlife friendly netting has a tight weave and is advertised as hail guard or crop protector.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

We have been rescuing a large number of lactating female black flying foxes from our heavily affected colony. These mothers have been affected by the ‘paralysis syndrome’ and are weak, unable to fly, feed or tend to their babies. We have no option but to bring these mothers into care. Sadly none of the females we rescued had their babies with them which means a motherless baby is left behind in the camp. As we have been sweeping our heavily affected camp we have been finding and rescuing as many of these motherless babies as we can. This is challenging as camps contain thousands of bats and many of the babies can now fly short distances. Pictured are just some of the very emaciated babies we have been able to rescue and give a second chance. This paralysis syndrome doesn’t just directly affect bats, babies are also indirect casualties.

At the risk of jinxing ourselves, we have seen a significant drop in paralysis cases. This is a massive relief to all involved as our rescuers and rehabilitators were stretched thin. Our rehabilitators do still have a long road of hard work ahead as the large number of bats we have rescued need ongoing care before release.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

There are many hazards when you’re a juvenile flying fox learning about the world. CityCat is only three months old and she was flying upriver one night when she collided with the mast of a CityCat ferry going downstream.
For our non-local friends, Brisbane, where we are based, is a city with a large river and part of our public transport system includes catamarans called CityCats.

Poor little CityCat dropped to the deck, stunned and aching, where the pilot saw her and called us to rescue her. Thank you! Our rescuer had to be at the next terminal the ferry was due to stop at, to go on board and pick her up. She had a few days in an ICU and is now continuing her recovery in a flight aviary.

If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This handsome man is Mitty, an adult black flying fox. We don’t know exactly how he ended up on this patio chair but there’s a large mango tree nearby. He may have got into a scuffle with another bat and fallen, then crawled around looking for something to hang from until he felt less bruised and sore.

Thank you, Nicole, for calling us so we could give him the care he needs. He's now enjoying a rest in a warm bed with a dish of mango and banana.

You too could help save a bat's life. If you see a bat on its own in the daytime, it needs help.
Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue in other regions.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This dignified older lady is Amren, a black flying fox. Amren was spotted by our rescuers doing a sweep of a colony heavily affected by the paralysis event. Amren was hanging low in an abnormal position and did not move when approached. Once she was rescued it was clear how emaciated and unwell she was. Heartbreakingly she was also lactating, meaning her baby was still in the colony but we did not know where. Amren was rushed to one of our carers for fluids and intensive treatment. Thankfully she was still able to swallow slowly, as the paralysis syndrome affects their ability to swallow. Amren was able to drink our special mango smoothie and stat to put on some much needed weight as she rested in bed. Amren has been in care for a couple of weeks now and has significantly improved. She will head to a flight aviary shortly to do the last of her healing before release.

The video includes a guest appearance by Brie, an overly friendly grey headed flying fox orphan.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This handsome man is Cassian, a black flying fox. Cassian was spotted by himself, hanging low in a shrub by a homeowner. Thankfully they knew this was not normal and called us in quickly. One of our rescuers arrived and could see that he appeared to be suffering from the ongoing paralysis syndrome. As a rehabilitator herself, she quickly got Cassian home and put him on IV fluids and oxygen. Cassian was in a very bad way, unable to swallow, emaciated and with ulcers on both eyes from not being able to blink. It took a couple of days for him to recover enough to slowly drink mango smoothie, which he thoroughly enjoyed! Over the past couple of weeks he has continued to regain his strength and will be heading to a flight aviary on the weekend to do the last of his recovery before release.

It’s because of the support of our followers that we are able to purchase the medical equipment our rehabilitators use. This gives bats like Cassian the best possible chance of recovery ❤️

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

This sweet girl is Feyre, a female black flying fox. Feyre was victim to the ongoing paralysis event where flying foxes are ingesting an unknown toxin, causing them to become very ill. Feyre was found hanging alone in a palm tree by a couple of our rescuers doing a search of the area. She was rescued and brought into our care where she was given ample fluids to help flush her system and the all you can eat mango smoothie buffet. Thankfully Feyre was not too far gone when our rescuers spotted her and she has steadily improved in our care. It won’t be long until she can head to the flight aviary to do the last of her healing before release.

We still do not know the cause of the ongoing paralysis event but we are in contact with a researcher studying something similar in lorikeets. We are still doing our best to push for answers but it’s going to take time. In the mean time we are still attending rescues for paralysis syndrome bats called in by the public and periodically searching heavily affected areas for unwell bats. We have a large number of these bats in our care requiring intensive and time consuming treatment as we try to save as many as we can.

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

One of our rescuers was alerted to a social media post about a baby flying fox hanging alone on high voltage powerlines. She got in touch with the poster and headed over to assess the situation and wait for Energex to arrive to assist.
The member of the public who found baby Crypto had heard cries for a day or two before spotting him but by the time our rescuer arrived Crypto was silent and very still.
When Energex got there it had started raining and still Crypto hadn’t moved or made a sound. The member of the public, Energex crew and rescuer were all almost sure the baby had died. Given there is always a chance of life the Energex crew agreed to try and collect him. Those on the ground waited anxiously to see what would happen, as surely the pole and net would encourage the baby to move if it was alive.
As soon as the pole got close to Crypto he sprang to life and started screaming. Everyone was very excited. Unfortunately it wouldn’t be easy and Crypto somehow ended up attached to the rescue gear with the high voltage wire running between its body and the bottom of the net. The Energex crew persevered and eventually managed to get the baby away from the wire and into the net securely, enabling them to bring him down safely.

Baby Crypto has been sponsored and named in honour of Aeris ❤️

Remember that any bat by itself during the day is in need of help. Don’t touch the bat and give us a call immediately on ‭0488 228 134‬ for Brisbane and surrounds or your local wildlife rescue for other regions. ‬‬‬‬
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook